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CACIQUES ELOGIAM GOVERNO, MAS COBRAM INVESTIMENTOS (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 27, 2009

Segunda-feira, 26 de Janeiro de 2009 14:30

por Fernanda Mathias e Paulo Fernandes

PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

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Posted in A PRESIDÊNCIA, A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, A QUESTÃO ÉTNICA, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, COMBATE À DESIGUALDADE E À EXCLUSÃO - BRASIL, DESENVOLVIMENTO SUSTENTÁVEL, DIREITOS HUMANOS - BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, EXPANSÃO AGRÍCOLA, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, INTERNATIONAL, LUIS INÁCIO LULA DA SILVA, NATIVE PEOPLES, O MOVIMENTO DOS POVOS NATIVOS, O PODER EXECUTIVO FEDERAL, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, RESTRUCTURING OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

BOLIVIANS APPROVE NEW CONSTITUTION

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 26, 2009

Sunday, January 25, 2009

by Tyler Bridges – McClatchy Newspapers

PUBLISHED BY ‘McCLATHY NEWSPAPERS’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘McCLATHY NEWSPAPERS’ (USA)

Posted in BOLIVIA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, HUMAN RIGHTS, INTERNATIONAL, NATIVE PEOPLES, RECESSION, RESTRUCTURING OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR, STATE TARIFFS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

ENIR TERENA É EMPOSSADA PRIMEIRA CACIQUE MULHER DE MS (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 23, 2008

Segunda-feira, 22 de Dezembro de 2008 – 11:15

por Ângela Kempfer e Aline dos Santos

PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

Posted in A QUESTÃO ÉTNICA, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, CIDADES, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMY, NATIVE PEOPLES, O MOVIMENTO DOS POVOS NATIVOS, PECUÁRIA | Leave a Comment »

BRAZIL TO BOOST TROOPS IN AMAZON, REBUILD WEAPONS INDUSTRY

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 22, 2008

10:17 PM EST – December 18, 2008

by Marco Sibaja – Associated Press Writer

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE HARTFORD COURANT’ (USA)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE HARTFORD COURANT’ (USA)

Posted in A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, AC, AM, AS FORÇAS ARMADAS, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, INTERNATIONAL, NATIVE PEOPLES, O PODER EXECUTIVO FEDERAL, POLÍTICA REGIONAL, RECESSION, RO, RR, THE ARMS INDUSTRY | Leave a Comment »

AMAZON KILLINGS GO ON DESPITE CHICO MENDES’ LEGACY (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 22, 2008

December 21, 2008

by Bradley Brooks – The Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘TOPIX.NET’ (USA)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘TOPIX.NET’ (USA)

Posted in A CORRUPÇÃO NO APARELHO DO ESTADO, A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, A QUESTÃO ÉTNICA, AC, AGRONEGÓCIOS, ATIVIDADES CRIMINOSAS - BRASIL, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, CIDADES, COMBATE À DESIGUALDADE E À EXCLUSÃO - BRASIL, CORRUPÇÃO - BRASIL, CORRUPÇÃO NA POLÍTICA, CRIMES AMBIENTAIS - BRASIL, CRIMES EMPRESARIAIS, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, DEPUTADOS ESTADUAIS, DIREITOS HUMANOS - BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, EXPANSÃO AGRÍCOLA, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, HISTORY, HUMAN RIGHTS, INTERNATIONAL, NATIVE PEOPLES, O MOVIMENTO DOS POVOS NATIVOS, O PODER EXECUTIVO MUNICIPAL, O PODER JUDICIÁRIO, OS GOVERNADORES, OS JUDICIÁRIOS ESTADUAIS, OS PREFEITOS, PECULATO, PREVARICAÇÃO, RECESSION | 1 Comment »

INCRA EXONERA SUPERINTENDENTE PRESO EM MATO GROSSO (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 21, 2008

20 de dezembro de 2008 – 11h01

Só Notícias

PUBLISHED BY ‘SÓ NOTÍCIAS’ (MT – Brazil)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘SÓ NOTÍCIAS’ (MT – Brazil)

Posted in A CORRUPÇÃO NO APARELHO DO ESTADO, A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, A QUESTÃO ÉTNICA, AGRICULTURA, AGRICULTURE, ATIVIDADES CRIMINOSAS - BRASIL, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, CIDADES, COMBATE À CORRUPÇÃO - BRASIL, COMBATE À DESIGUALDADE E À EXCLUSÃO - BRASIL, CORRUPÇÃO - BRASIL, CORRUPÇÃO NA POLÍTICA, CORRUPTION, CRIMES AMBIENTAIS - BRASIL, CRIMES EMPRESARIAIS, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, DIREITOS HUMANOS - BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, EXPANSÃO AGRÍCOLA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INTERNATIONAL, JUDICIARY SYSTEMS, MT, NATIVE PEOPLES, O MOVIMENTO DOS POVOS NATIVOS, O MOVIMENTO DOS SEM-TERRA (MST), O PODER JUDICIÁRIO, OS JUDICIÁRIOS ESTADUAIS, OS TRIBUNAIS REGIONAIS ELEITORAIS, PECUÁRIA, PECULATO, POLÍTICA REGIONAL, PREVARICAÇÃO, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

ÍNDIOS ‘PEITAM’ JUSTIÇA TROCAM TIROS COM POLÍCIA E FAZEM REFÉM EM MT (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 21, 2008

20 de dezembro de 2008 – 19h16

Olhar Direto

PUBLISHED BY ‘SÓ NOTÍCIAS’ (MT – Brazil)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘SÓ NOTÍCIAS’ (MT – Brazil)

Posted in A CORRUPÇÃO NO APARELHO DO ESTADO, A CRIMINALIZAÇÃO DOS MOVIMENTOS SOCIAIS, A POLÍCIA CIVIL, A POLÍCIA MILITAR, A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, A QUESTÃO ÉTNICA, BRASIL, CIDADANIA, CIDADES, COMBATE À CORRUPÇÃO - BRASIL, COMBATE À DESIGUALDADE E À EXCLUSÃO - BRASIL, CORRUPÇÃO - BRASIL, CRIMES EMPRESARIAIS, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, DIREITOS HUMANOS - BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, HUMAN RIGHTS, MT, NATIVE PEOPLES, O MOVIMENTO DOS POVOS NATIVOS, O MOVIMENTO RURALISTA, O PODER EXECUTIVO ESTADUAL, O PODER JUDICIÁRIO, OS GOVERNADORES, OS JUDICIÁRIOS ESTADUAIS, OS TRIBUNAIS REGIONAIS ELEITORAIS, PECULATO, POLÍTICA REGIONAL, PREVARICAÇÃO, SETOR EXPORTADOR, WARS AND ARMED CONFLICTS | 1 Comment »

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS ROW THREATENS RAINFOREST PROTECTION PLAN – Green groups accuse US, Australia, New Zealand and Canada of deleting lines on indigenous peoples’ rights in draft agreement in Poznan on climate change and deforestation

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 9, 2008

Tuesday December 9 2008 – 18.06 GMT

by David Adam – guardian.co.uk

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE GUARDIAN’ (UK)

Talks aimed at finding ways to protect tropical forests in a new global deal on global warming hit problems today after a row over the rights of indigenous people.

Green groups accused the US, Australia, New Zealand and Canada of deleting a line about indigenous peoples’ rights from a draft agreement due to have been published tonight, as part of UN talks on climate change.

The original confidential draft, seen by the Guardian, talked of “noting the rights and importance of engaging indigenous peoples and other local communities”.

The amended version mentions only “recognising the need to promote the full and effective participation of indigenous and local communities”. The change sparked protests at the Poznan meeting by delegates representing indigenous groups from Panama and the US.

Campaigners said the suggested change would leave indigenous people across the world vulnerable to exploitation under proposals to pay tropical nations not to cut down forests.

A joint statement from groups including Friends of the Earth and the Rainforest Foundation condemned the change as “totally unacceptable”. It said: “The forests being targetted… are those which indigenous peoples have sustained and protected for thousands of years. The rights of forest peoples to continue playing this role, and being rewarded for doing so, has to be recognised.”

Talks continue, but the row threatens to derail attempts to agree a rulebook for forest-protection schemes, which was supposed to have paved the way to include them in a new global climate deal to succeed the Kyoto protocol. Deforestation causes almost a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions.

Negotiators had said such an agreement on forests was one of the few breakthroughs expected at the Poznan talks, which are largely a preparatory meeting for more serious negotiations next year.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE GUARDIAN’ (UK)

Posted in AUSTRALIA, CANADA, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, INTERNATIONAL, NATIVE PEOPLES, NEW ZEALAND, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, USA | Leave a Comment »

CBCP CALLS FOR HALT TO MINING IN RP (Philippines)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 9, 2008

First Posted 20:46:00 12/09/2008

by Dona Pazzibugan – Philippine Daily Inquirer

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER’

MANILA, Philippines – The Catholic Church leadership said on Tuesday the Arroyo administration should immediately halt mining operations due to the “uncontrollable plunder” of the country’s natural resources.

The Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) made the call in a pastoral letter it issued on December 8 titled, “Upholding the Sanctity of Life.”

It has been 20 years since the CBCP last issued a pastoral letter on the environment which was titled, “What is happening to our beautiful land?”

In its latest pastoral letter, which would be read in all Church masses, the CBCP called for a moratorium on mining activities “until the government and the mining companies learn to uphold the rights of the indigenous peoples, compensate the affected communities for past damage and ensure responsible mining activities.”

The CBCP assailed the mining industry for its “poor record of community accountability.”

It said mining companies “have systematically engaged in the rape of Mother Earth and left a legacy of impoverished communities and environmental despoliation.”

Hitting the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, the CBCP said most of the mining projects were given an environmental compliance certificate “without securing the free prior and informed consent of the affected communities.”

The bishops said the government compromised the country’s long-term development goals due to its “uncontrolled and poorly regulated exploitation” of mineral resources.

“The Mining Act of 1995 encourages the exploitation by granting priority access rights to water and timber. Communities are slowly eased out of their land as expansion sites granted with mining permits and clearances affect considerable portions of land utilized for agriculture,” the CBCP said.

The CBCP also called for a stop to illegal logging and “multisectoral cooperation” would be necessary to stop the threat to the country’s forests.

It said most of the country’s watersheds have been denuded through land conversion that was aggravated by slash-and-burn farming and illegal logging.

The CBCP called on the government to enforce a total commercial log ban and to intensify efforts to reforest denuded areas vulnerable to earthquakes, landslides and floods.

The CBCP also supported making use of healthier and less destructive sources of energy such as those from wind and solar energies, water and geothermal resources.

“The challenge to preserve our beautiful land may be difficult but not impossible,” the CBCP said, adding “no material gain can equate with the value of life.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER’ (USA)

Posted in CATHOLICISM, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, HUMAN RIGHTS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MINING INDUSTRIES, NATIONAL WORK FORCES, NATIVE PEOPLES, PHILIPPINES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE WORKERS | 1 Comment »

CHAGOS ISLANDS – STEALING A NATION – THE CORRUPTION THAT MAKES UNPEOPLE OF AN ENTIRE NATION

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 28, 2008

28/11/2008

CHAGOS ISLANDS – STEALING A NATION – by John Pilger

CLICK HERE FOR A HIGH DEFINITION VERSION OF THE ENTIRE VIDEO

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The native islanders of the Chagos archipelago were forcibly removed from the CHAGOS' FLAGislands by the British Government at that time to make way for an American military airbase during the Cold War. They were forgotten about and left to wither in poverty in the slums of Mauritius. They have been fighting to be allowed to return home ever since, and despite the British courts ruling in favour of this the Government has managed to block that decision, and the Chagossians remain in their enforced purgatory to this day.

STEALING A NATION (John Pilger, 2004) is an extraordinary film about the plight of people of the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean – secretly and brutally expelled from their homeland by British governments in the late 1960s CHAGOS ARCHIPELAGOand early 1970s, to make way for an American military base. The base, on the main island of Diego Garcia, was a launch pad for the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. Stealing a Nation has won both the Royal Television Society’s top award as Britain’s best documentary in 2004-5, and a ‘Chris Award’ at the Columbus International Film and Video Festival. A brochure of the film is available at http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/guides/stealguide.pdf. On April 8, 2008, the Chagos Islanders have launched a national Campaign for Resettlement of their islands – go to www.letthemreturn.com. For more information and updates on the plight of the Chagossians, visit the website of the UK Chagos Support Association at www.chagossupport.org.uk.

Other references and articles on the story are as listed below: CHAGOS ARCHIPELAGO

http://www.chagos.org/home.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politic…

Islanders who wait in vain for justice and a paradise lost
Evicted from their tropical idyll in a military deal, victorious in three legal hearings, they now face another battle to be allowed home – From The Times – November 9, 2007

THE CORRUPTION THAT MAKES UNPEOPLE OF AN ENTIRE NATION

27 Nov 2008

In his column for the New Statesman, John Pilger describes the latest chapter in theCHAGOS ARCHIPELAGO extraordinary story of the ‘mass kidnapping’ of the people of the Chagos islands in the Indian Ocean, British citizens expelled from their homeland to make way for an American military base. On 22 October, Britain’s highest court of appeal, the Law Lords, demonstrated how British power words at its apex by handing down a transparently political judgement that dismissed the Magna Carta and banned an entire nation from ever going home.

I went to the Houses of Parliament on 22 October to join a disconsolate group of shivering people who had arrived from a faraway tropical place and were being prevented from entering the Public Gallery to hear their fate. This was not headline news; the BBC reporter seemed almost CHAGOS REFUGEES PROTESTING IN LONDONembarrassed. Crimes of such magnitude are not news when they are ours, and neither is injustice or corruption at the apex of British power.

Lizette Talatte was there, her tiny frail self swallowed by the cavernous stone grey of Westminster Hall. I first saw her in a Colonial Office film from the 1950s which described her homeland, the island of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, as a paradise long settled by people “born and brought up in conditions most tranquil and benign”. Lizette was then 14 years old. She remembers the producer saying to her and her friends, “Keep smiling, girls!”. When we met in Mauritius, four years ago, she said: “We didn’t need to be told to smile. I was a happy child, because my roots were deep in Diego Garcia. My great-grandmother was born there, and I made six children there. Maybe only the English can make a film that showed we were an established community, then deny their own evidence and invent the lie that we were transient workers.”CHAGOS REFUGEES PROTESTING - STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ROYAL COURT OF JUSTICE IN LONDON

During the 1960s and 1970s British governments, Labour and Tory, tricked and expelled the entire population of the Chagos Archipelago, more than 2,000 British citizens, so that Diego Garcia could be given to the United States as the site for a military base. It was an act of mass kidnapping carried out in high secrecy. As unclassified official files now show, Foreign Office officials conspired to lie, coaching each other to “maintain” and “argue” the “fiction” that the Chagossians existed only as a “floating population”. On 28 July 1965, a senior Foreign Office official, T C D Jerrom, wrote to the British representative at the United Nations, instructing him to lie to the General Assembly that the Chagos Archipelago was “uninhabited when the United Kingdom government first acquired it”. Nine years later, the Ministry of Defence went further, lying CHAGOS REFUGEES PROTESTING - Louis Olivier Bancoult, (2nd L) Chairman of the Chagos Refugees Group, holds his grandson Julien aloft outside The High Court in central London, 23 May 2007. Families expelled from the Chagos Islands by the British Government to make way for the Diego Garcia US airbase won their legal battle to return home Wednesday. The decision upholds two previous rulings in favour of the islanders, granting them rights of abodethat “there is nothing in our files about inhabitants [of the Chagos] or about an evacuation”.

“To get us out of our homes,” Lizette told me, “they spread rumours we would be bombed, then they turned on our dogs. The American soldiers who had arrived to build the base backed several of their big vehicles against a brick shed, and hundreds of dogs were rounded up and imprisoned there, and they gassed them through a tube from the trucks’ exhaust. You could hear them crying. Then they burned them on a pyre, many still alive.”

Lizette and her family were finally forced on to a rusting freighter and made to lie on a cargo of bird fertiliser during a voyage, through stormy seas, to the slums of Port Louis, Mauritius. Within A demonstrator demanding her return to the Chagos Islands in the Diego Garcia archipelago shouts during a protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London October 22, 2008. Britain's highest court ruled in favour of the British government on Wednesday, blocking the return of hundreds of Chagos Island people to their homes in the south Indian Ocean after nearly 40 years of exile. The decision by the House of Lords ends a years-long battle to secure the Chagos Islanders the right to return to their archipelago, from where they were forcibly removed in the 1960s and '70s to make way for an American airbase on Diego Garcia.months, she had lost Jollice, aged eight, and Regis, aged ten months. “They died of sadness,” she said. “The eight-year-old had seen the horror of what had happened to the dogs. The doctor said he could not treat sadness.”

Since 2000, no fewer than nine high court judgments have described these British government actions as “illegal”, “outrageous” and “repugnant”. One ruling cited Magna Carta, which says no free man can be sent into exile. In desperation, the Blair government used the royal prerogative – the divine right of kings – to circumvent the courts and parliament and to ban the islanders from even visiting the Chagos. When this, too, was overturned by the high court, the government was rescued by the law lords, of whom a majority of one (three to two) found for the government in a scandalously inept, political manner. In the weasel, almost flippant words of LordChagos Islanders look on while Louis Olivier Bancoult (R), Chairman of the Chagos Refugees Group, addresses the media outside The High Court in central London, 23 May 2007. Families expelled from the Chagos Islands by the British Government to make way for the Diego Garcia US airbase won their legal battle to return home Wednesday. The decision upholds two previous rulings in favour of the islanders, granting them rights of abode Hoffmann, “the rightof abode is a creature of the law. The law gives it and the law takes it away.” Forget Magna Carta. Human rights are in the gift of three stooges doing the dirty work of a government, itself lawless.

As the official files show, the Chagos conspiracy and cover-up involved three prime ministers and 13 cabinet ministers, including those who approved “the plan”. But elite corruption is unspeakable in Britain. I know of no work of serious scholarship on this crime against humanity. The honourable exception is the work of the historian Mark Curtis, who describes the Chagossians as “unpeople”.

The reason for this silence is ideological. Courtier commentators and media historians obstruct our CHAGOS ISLANDERS IN FORCED EXILE - Dervillie Permal and his wifeview of the recent past, ensuring, as Harold Pinter pointed out in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, that while the “systematic brutality, the widespread atrocities, the ruthless suppression of independent thought” in Stalinist Russia were well known in the west, the great state crimes of western governments “have only been superficially recorded, let alone documented”.

Typically, the pop historian Tristram Hunt writes in the Observer (23 November): “Nestling in the slipstream of American hegemony served us well in the 20th century. The bonds of culture, religion, language and ideology ensured Britain a postwarLouis Olivier Bancoult, Chairman of the Chagos Refugees Group, celebrates outside The High Court in central London, 23 May 2007. The High Court on Wednesday upheld a ruling letting families return to their Indian Ocean island homes, from where they were forced out 30 years ago to make way for a US military base. The Court of Appeal backed a High Court ruling in May last year that allowed the families to return to the Chagos Islands, except for Diego Garcia, a launchpad for US military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Britain expelled some 2,000 people from the Chagos Islands, 500 kilometres (310 miles) south of the Maldives, to Mauritius and the Seychelles in the 1960s and 1970s, allowing it to lease Diego Garcia to Washington for 50 years economic bailout, a nuclear deterrent and the continuing ability to ‘punch above our weight’ on the world stage. Thanks to US patronage, our story of decolonisation was for us a relatively painless affair…”

Not a word of this drivel hints at the transatlantic elite’s Cold War paranoia, which put us all in mortal danger, or the rapacious Anglo-American wars that continue to claim untold lives. As part of the “bonds” that allow us to “punch above our weight”, the US gave Britain a derisory $14m discount off the price of Polaris nuclear missiles in exchange for the Chagos Islands, whose “painless decolonisation” was etched on Lizette Talatte’s face the other day. Never forget, Lord Hoffmann, that she, too, will die of sadness.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘JOHN PILGER’S WEB SITE’

Posted in CORRUPTION, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, ENGLAND, FOREIGN POLICIES, FOREIGN POLICIES - USA, HISTORY, HUMAN RIGHTS, INDIAN OCEAN ISLANDS, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, IRELAND, JUDICIARY SYSTEMS, MILITARY CONTRACTS, NATIVE PEOPLES, SCOTLAND, THE ARMS INDUSTRY, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, THE MEDIA (US AND FOREIGN), THE PRESIDENCY - USA, THE UNITED NATIONS, UNITED KINGDOM, USA, WARS AND ARMED CONFLICTS | Leave a Comment »

5 MIL INDIGENAS MARCHAN POR NUEVA LEY DEL AGUA (Ecuador)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 21, 2008

Jueves, 20 de Nov de 2008

Alrededor de 5.000 indígenas ecuatorianos marcharon hoy en la provincia de Imbabura (al norte de Siete mil indigenas ecuatorianos marcharon en Quito en protesta por la operación militar colombiana realizada en territorio del vecino pais en la que murió Raúl Reyes, miembro del secretariado de las Farc - 11 Mar 2008 - Foto - Agencia EFEQuito) para exigir a la Comisión Legislativa que acepte su propuesta sobre una nueva ley de agua y soberanía alimentaria.

Convocados por la Confederación de Nacionalidades Indígenas de Ecuador (Conaie) y por la Confederación Quichua (Ecuarunari), integrantes de las comunidades indígenas de la región andina caminaron entre siete y diez kilómetros al grito de: “El agua no se vende, el agua se defiende”.

Los indígenas avanzaron en varias columnas desde diferentes poblaciones para reunirse al pie de un escenario, situado en un cruce de la vía Panamericana, en donde los dirigentes del movimiento emitieron sus discursos.

El presidente de la Ecuarunari, Humberto Cholango, manifestó desde la tarima oficial, primero en quichua y después en español, que los indígenas no permitirán “ni muertos la privatización del agua” ni que privaticen sus recursos naturales.

Acompañados de indígenas de Bolivia, Perú y Colombia, entre otros países, la Conaie y sus filiales presentaron su propuesta de ley de agua y de soberanía alimentaria ante un grupo de asambleístas de la Comisión Legislativa que fueron invitados a la concentración.

Cholango pidió a los asambleístas que “se acabe la infamia de apropiarse del agua y de los recursos naturales”, y advirtió a los políticos que tengan cuidado de que “la revolución no se quede a medio amanecer”, refiriéndose a la revolución ciudadana que promulga el Gobierno de Rafael Correa.

Según el dirigente de la Ecuarunari, los pueblos no van a dimitir y van a continuar “con este proceso de cambio”, y anunció que habrá próximas concentraciones y marchas para fortalecer sus peticiones al Gobierno.

“Esperamos que la Comisión Legislativa abra las puertas, abra el debate a los ecuatorianos para que podamos participar, no tenemos miedo al debate”, agregó Cholango.

En un acto cargado de simbolismos de las culturas ancestrales, los indígenas regalaron un collar de flores y frutos a los asambleístas “para que no se vendan” y defiendan la propuesta, gritó alguien de entre el público.

El vicepresidente de la Comisión Legislativa, César Rodríguez, uno de los asambleístas invitados, destacó “el ejercicio democrático” que demuestra el trabajo que realizan los indígenas con esta propuesta.

“Esta iniciativa confirma que se puede construir una legislación desde el pueblo, con el pueblo y para el pueblo”, indicó Rodríguez.

El pasado lunes se realizaron otras marchas en diversos puntos del país, convocadas por grupos de indígenas y ecologistas, pidiendo que se archive el proyecto de una nueva ley minera que está trabajando el Gobierno ecuatoriano.

Dirigentes indígenas consultados por Efe informaron de que se preparan propuestas para incluir en esta ley minera, que pronto presentarán a la Comisión Legislativa.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘EL DIARIO’ (Ecuador)

Posted in ECUADOR, HUMAN RIGHTS, INTERNATIONAL, NATIVE PEOPLES | Leave a Comment »

ABORIGINAL JOB PLAN LAUNCHED TODAY (Australia)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on October 30, 2008

AM – Thursday, 30 October , 2008 08:12:00

Reporter: Sara Everingham

PETER CAVE: Corporate Australia is pledging to provide almost 5000 jobs for Indigenous people as part of the most ambitious Indigenous employment scheme to date.

The Australian Employment Covenant is being launched in Sydney today by its founder mining magnate Andrew Forrest and the Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.

The plan is to get 50,000 Indigenous people into meaningful work in the private sector in the next two years.

Sara Everingham reports.

SARA EVERINGHAM: It’s an ambitious plan but the Indigenous leader Warren Mundine is confident the Australian Employment Covenant will succeed. He’s helping drive the program founded by Fortescue Metals chief executive Andrew Forrest in August.

Warren Mundine says already almost 5000 jobs are being offered by the corporate sector.

WARREN MUNDINE: Corporate Australia is right onside. Now we need to drill down into the rest of the industries across Australia such as small business and so on.

SARA EVERINGHAM: The plan is to get companies to agree to employ a certain number of Indigenous people with the Government to provide training. The workers in the scheme will be matched up with buddies or mentors to help them stay in the jobs.

Warren Mundine says most of the positions will be in New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia where most Indigenous people live and he says the positions will cover many fields.

WARREN MUNDINE: Retail, hospitality and tourism, the mining industry, of course. They have a very successful record already, but we’ll break into IT and the law and so on.

SARA EVERINGHAM: But the scheme has its critics. Some argue it’s overly ambitious and others wonder whether Indigenous people will be willing to leave their country to work away from home.

WARREN MUNDINE: You have to overly ambitious. Look at the statistics in regard to Aboriginal employment in Australia. They’re dreadful.

SARA EVERINGHAM: The Indigenous leader Noel Pearson is a strong supporter of the scheme but he says the Government needs to go further in its support.

He wants legislation exempting school leavers from the 90-minute rule that sees people only obliged to take jobs within a 90-minute commuting time, and Warren Mundine agrees.

WARREN MUNDINE: Having to travel and having to move from your community does not isolate you from your country. It does not isolate you from your culture.

PETER CAVE: The Indigenous leader, Warren Mundine ending Sara Everingham’s report.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘ABC.NET’ (Australia)

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