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ECONOMISTA PREGA PROTECIONISMO PARA DESENVOLVIMENTO DE PAÍSES POBRES

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 14, 2009

12 de Janeiro de 2009 – 23h53

Vinicius Konchinski – Repórter da Agência Brasil

PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

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PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

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Posted in AFRICA, ASIA, BALANÇA COMERCIAL, BRASIL, CENTRAL AMERICA, COMÉRCIO - BRASIL, COMMERCE, COMMERCIAL PROTECTIONISM, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, FOREIGN POLICIES, INDÚSTRIAS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, MACROECONOMY, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, SOUTH AMERICA, STATE TARIFFS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

AMÉRICA LATINA PRECISA DIVERSIFICAR A INDÚSTRIA, AFIRMA ECONOMISTA (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 14, 2009

13 de Janeiro de 2009 – 20h46

por Vinicius Konchinski – Repórter da Agência Brasil

PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

Posted in BRASIL, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, EXPANSÃO INDUSTRIAL, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, INDÚSTRIAS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, LATIN AMERICA, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

BID ELEVA RECURSOS PARA FINANCIAMENTO DO COMÉRCIO NA AMÉRICA LATINA E CARIBE

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 14, 2009

13 de Janeiro de 2009 – 20h01

por Stênio Ribeiro – Repórter da Agência Brasil

PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘AGÊNCIA BRASIL’

Posted in CENTRAL AMERICA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ORGANIZATIONS AND FORUMS, LATIN AMERICA, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

LATIN AMERICA SUMMIT: NEW INDEPENDENCE, END EMBARGO

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 18, 2008

December 17, 2008 – 5:55pm

by Bradley Brooks – Associated Press Writer

PUBLISHED BY ‘WTOP’ (USA)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘WTOP’ (USA)

Posted in BRASIL, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FOREIGN POLICIES, FOREIGN POLICIES - USA, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, POLÍTICA EXTERNA - BRASIL, RECESSION, RELAÇÕES DIPLOMÁTICAS - BRASIL, RELAÇÕES INTERNACIONAIS - BRASIL, SOUTH AMERICA, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009 | Leave a Comment »

ASIA IS A BANKING EL DORADO, SAYS EXPERT

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 12, 2008

December 12, 2008

by Richard Gluyas – The Australian

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE AUSTRALIAN’

Asia looms as an El Dorado for major Australian banks in the same way Spanish lenders have enjoyed the fruits of their Latin American expansion, according to consultancy Accenture.

Financial services practice global head Pierre Nanterme said yesterday the big four banks would concentrate on getting their local franchises in order over the next year.

“That means avoiding doing anything stupid, investing in the domestic market and driving their cost-to-income ratios down to 40 per cent,” he said. “In a year’s time, they should have a unique operating model that they can use as an acquisition and integration engine in the region.

“Asia is a new El Dorado, and banks making bets in the region will get the same kind of returns the Spanish banks have from investing in Latin America a decade ago.”

Mr Nanterme, who is in Australia to meet banking leaders, said the global banking landscape had changed irreversibly as a result of the financial crisis.

There would be a select few super-global players, certainly including HSBC, which was coming out of the crisis “even stronger”, and possibly a wounded Citigroup, he said.

Then, in markets such as Britain, France, Germany and Spain, as well as the US, there would be groupings of three or four giants, each with market shares of about 20 per cent.

The Australian banking industry, Mr Nanterme said, had been structured along those lines for some time, and in that sense was ahead of the curve.

However, the opportunity existed for strong domestic players to become super-regional operations, replicating the success of the Spanish bank, Santander, which had acquired Abbey National, and Alliance and Leicester, in Britain.

“I’ve found banking leaders here saying they’d like to be the Santander of Asia, which means dominating your home market first, and from that base developing an industrial model, underpinned with technology, that can be exported to the rest of the world,” Mr Nanterme said.

“They make the comparison with Santander, which has 30 per cent market share in Spain, and a cost-to-income ratio of 50 per cent – very good in Europe.”

A year ago he might have been critical of the reluctance of Australian banks to embrace Asia, the Accenture chief said.

The exception would have been ANZ Bank, with new chief executive Mike Smith already having revealed his plan to create a super-regional bank.

Then the financial crisis had intervened.

“The crisis has forced us all to be a little more humble, but certainly the potential is there in Asia in the medium to long term,” Mr Nanterme said.

“In Europe, the economy will be in recession for the next couple of years, but if you’re a super-regional in Asia, you’re looking at 2-3 per cent growth for the region, minimum.”

Local banks, in the short term, would concentrate more on the cost line than revenue expansion.

This could involve re-engineering the business, investment in software, and improved efficiency of the back office through outsourcing and offshoring of jobs to countries with cheaper labour.

“Banking will become more industrialised, like a manufacturing company,” Mr Nanterme said. “The name of the game is scale, and customers expect a low unit price.”

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE AUSTRALIAN’

Posted in ASIA, AUSTRALIA, BANKING SYSTEMS, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRIES, FOREIGN POLICIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, OUTSOURCING INDUSTRIES, RECESSION, SPAIN, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE WORK MARKET | Leave a Comment »

NOW IS THE TIME FOR POLITICS – MORE GOVERNMENT IS THE SOLUTION, NOT THE PROBLEM, AND KEY TO SOLVING WORLD POVERTY (Brasil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 9, 2008

DECEMBER 2008 – FEBRUARY 2009

by Luis Inácio Lula da Silva

PUBLISHED BY ‘NEWSWEEK’ (USA) – SPECIAL EDITION – ISSUES 2009

The world today is experiencing turbulence unlike anything we’ve seen in decades. The U.S. credit crisis has contaminated the international economy, and financial systems have been shaken to the core, undermining economic doctrines once treated as absolute truths.

As I told the UN. General Assembly in September, now is the time for politics, for governments to use public control and oversight to halt the economic anarchy. I welcome the actions that other countries have taken. But it will be some time before their initiatives kick in. That means more steps are needed in the meantime to safeguard the world’s most vulnerable: workers whose jobs and purchasing power are on the line, simple folk trying to save for the future, the poor who depend on the state.

The abuses and errors coming to light daily are all evidence that our existing system of international economic governance has broken down. To develop a better one, the world’s major developing countries should be called on to join the debate. We have plenty to contribute. Take Brazil. We are ready to do our part, and our economy is better prepared than most to confront the crisis. We have said no to macroeconomic adventurism. Inflation is under control and we are growing steadily. We have plenty of foreign reserves and owe nothing to the International Monetary Fund. This gives us the tools and the peace of mind to withstand the turbulence the crisis will bring.

Brazil is also better prepared to deal with the social and economic dislocation that may ensue. Consider: since I took office in 2003, more than 10 million Brazilians have joined the workforce. Some 20 million have risen out of absolute poverty. Our internal market is expanding, giving us an important economic cushion. Above all, we are redistributing income and reducing social inequality. These advances have nothing to do with luck or a favorable environment. They are the result of hard work by the Brazilian people and their government.

Weaving a broad social safety net is a central part of this endeavor. Our income-transfer program now distributes benefits to 11 million poor families nationwide, on the condition that mothers get prenatal care and parents keep their children in school and vaccinated. Our success shows that individual governments can and must play a vital role in reducing poverty and inequality. And our example in health care and education is already being made available to other countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia facing similar challenges.

That said, no state will escape this crisis on its own. Coordinated actions are needed. Yet they will succeed only if international decision making is redesigned in accordance with new realities; the institutions set up after World War II reflect a balance of power that’s long been superseded. This challenge actually goes far beyond the immediate financial storm. Other threats loom, such as hunger and poverty, the rising price and scarcity of food, the energy crisis and climate change. World commerce remains distorted, and the best means of addressing that—die Doha round of trade talks — could collapse.

Still, none of these obstacles is insurmountable. We all know the solutions, and we have the tools and the resources to succeed. Too often what we lack is political will. Many people today are comparing our current situation with the Great Depression. But we should take those parallels further and should summon the spirit of solidarity that helped create the New Deal, harnessing it to forge a new global pact to roll back poverty and extreme inequality. Contrary to what so many believe, globalization has only increased the economic and social responsibilities of governments. We must renew our commitment to strong multilateralism and we must make that multilateralism more democratic, in order to build agreements that reflect the legitimate interests of all nations. This means, among other things, enlarging the U.N. Security Council and revamping the IMF to provide effective financial support to countries in need.

The United States-by virtue of its size and its economic prowess—is and will continue to be a key player in the global search for common solutions. Washington has played such a decisive role since the end of World War II. Given the challenges and opportunities facing us today, we in the developing world hope that we can once again count on the American people to come to the defense of multilateralism, equality and justice. This is not the time for protectionism, but for progressive action born of generosity and solidarity that will forge collective answers to 21st-century challenges.

Luis Inácio Lula Da Silva is the President of Brazil.

PUBLISHED BY ‘NEWSWEEK’ (USA)

Posted in 'DOHA TALKS', A PRESIDÊNCIA, AFRICA, ASIA, BANKING SYSTEM - USA, BANKING SYSTEMS, BRASIL, CENTRAL BANKS, CIDADANIA, COMBATE À DESIGUALDADE E À EXCLUSÃO - BRASIL, COMMERCE, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, FOREIGN POLICIES, FOREIGN POLICIES - USA, G20, HISTORY, HOUSING CRISIS - USA, IMF, INDÚSTRIA DA CONSTRUÇÃO CIVIL, INFRAESTRUTURA - BRASIL, INSTITUIÇÕES DE FOMENTO NACIONAL, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, LUIS INÁCIO LULA DA SILVA, MACROECONOMY, O MERCADO DE TRABALHO - BRASIL, O PODER EXECUTIVO FEDERAL, OS TRABALHADORES, POLÍTICA EXTERNA - BRASIL, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RELAÇÕES DIPLOMÁTICAS - BRASIL, RELAÇÕES INTERNACIONAIS - BRASIL, SOUTH AMERICA, STOCK MARKETS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, THE WORK MARKET, THE WORKERS, USA | Leave a Comment »

WISE UP OR LOSE OUT, GM TELLS PARTS SUPPLIERS (South Africa)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 4, 2008

PORT ELIZABETH Thursday December 4, 2008

by Bob Kernohan – BUSINESS EDITOR

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE HERALD ON LINE’ (South Africa)

SMALL vehicle component suppliers need to smarten up or face the possibility of closing because they increasingly risk being uncompetitive, a motor company executive cautioned in Mandela Bay this week.

General Motors SA global purchasing and supply chain vice-president Evan Dold was speaking about the need for the vehicle manufacturing industry at all levels to become totally world competitive.

He said the cost of components in a vehicle made up 75% to 85% of the total.

Dold said studies carried out by GMSA in the second quarter had shown that there was an ex-factory “cost gap” of about 30% between a sample of parts sourced locally and the same parts sourced from the most competitive cost location in the Latin America, Africa, Middle East region, under which GM‘s SA operations fall.

He said further: “When sourced from the lowest cost sources globally, such as from emerging markets like Thailand, the gap increased to about 40%.”

Dold suggested that domestic manufacturers could capitalise on the weakness of the rand and narrow the competitiveness gap by increasing domestic content, so also providing a stronger hedge against future currency weakness.

“Growing local content while volumes are down will be a challenge. But it is not all doom and gloom, and the weak rand will work in our favour.

“We should also use the downturn to eliminate unnecessary costs so that when the rand strengthens, we are more competitive and profitable.”

Domestic component production volumes also needed to increase.

“This is a particularly difficult challenge right now, but the industry has always been cyclical and at some stage the markets will start turning.

“Even with the downturn in volumes globally, the weak rand should assist some of our more competitive local suppliers to grow volumes through new export contracts.

“In some cases we can also grow volumes with our most competitive local suppliers by rationalising our supply base and re-sourcing business from less competitive suppliers.”

On increased volumes, Dold said: “Our studies have shown that a doubling of volumes will on average lower the piece part cost by some 10% to 20%, depending on actual volumes.”

Asked about the possible implications for small domestic suppliers of changes worldwide, Dold said it had to be realised that manufacturers were now “globally integrated”.

“For instance, when we are told of a price increase by a local supplier, that information goes into the pot and it is discussed in a global context.

“It has to be realised 85% of GM‘s global business is done with its top 350 suppliers.”

If GMSA‘s local suppliers provided the required quality, service and world-competitive costing, the company would continue to do business with them, Dold said. Otherwise, it could look to its worldwide supply base.

He urged smaller suppliers to take advantage of opportunities in areas like joint ventures with similar enterprises or “selling out” to multinational companies.

Dold pointed to some steel component manufacturers and the catalytic convertor industry as being success stories.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE HERALD ON LINE’ (South Africa)

Posted in AFRICA, AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INDUSTRIES - USA, INTERNATIONAL, LATIN AMERICA, METALS INDUSTRY, MIDDLE EAST, RECESSION, SOUTH AFRICA, THAILAND, THE WORK MARKET, THE WORKERS | Leave a Comment »

BANANA FIGHT THREATENS DOHA DEAL – Deals in the Doha global trade talks next month are at risk if the European Union fails to settle a long-running banana dispute

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 27, 2008

November 27, 2008

by Alonso Soto in Quito, Ecuador

Article from: Reuters

Ecuador, the world’s top banana exporter, said it would not agree to agricultural accords in the Doha talks after the World Trade Organisation upheld a ruling against the EU in the lung-running “banana wars” pitting Brussels against the United States and Latin American producers.

“Unfortunately, our country will not agree to the consensus to settle the agriculture terms of the (Doha) round … if this problem is not properly resolved by then,” the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

A top government official told Reuters later that Latin American banana producers were demanding that the EU lower import tariffs on the fruit, beginning with a series of cuts starting next year.

The official, who asked not to be identified, said the EU should eventually cut its current duty of €176 ($349) per tonne of bananas to €114 ($226) in eight years.

Latin American states came close to securing a deal with the EU during a WTO ministerial meeting in July, but Brussels walked away from the deal when the broad Doha negotiations fell apart.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE AUSTRALIAN’ (USA)

Posted in 'DOHA TALKS', AGRICULTURE, BELGIUM, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMY, ECUADOR, FRUITS AND FRESH VEGETABLES, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, THE EUROPEAN UNION, USA, WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION | Leave a Comment »

IN LATIN AMERICA, MEDVEDEV WILL TAKE FIGHT TO US DOORSTEP

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 21, 2008

11/20/2008

MOSCOW — President Dmitry Medvedev embarks this week on a Latin American tour crafted to slake MEDVEDEV'S LATIN TOURRussia’s thirst for respect as a serious global power and carry its message of US defiance to Washington’s doorstep.

Medvedev’s four-nation trip kicks off Friday in Peru, where he will meet at the weekend with leaders of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, including outgoing US President George W. Bush and Chinese President Hu Jintao.

The Kremlin leader then heads to Brazil to meet its leftist President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva before traveling to Venezuela, whose maverick President Hugo Chavez is famous for his virulent broadsides against Washington.

For the grand finale, Medvedev rounds off his tour in Cuba, the flagship Cold War ally of the Soviet Union during the Cold War and the United States’ communist arch-foe in the western hemisphere since the late 1950s.

The Russian navy, keen to prove that reports of its death a decade ago were exaggerated, will flex its muscles under Washington’s nose by conducting joint maneuvers with Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea, officials said.

The extensive trip expands a Cold War-era strategy revived by Medvedev’s mentor Vladimir Putin of raising Russia’s profile globally and taking rivalry with the United States to Washington’s doorstep in Latin America, analysts said.

But it also comes as Russia has taken a battering in the global economic crisis, while calls by the new Kremlin leader for a reshaping of international financial and military structures have met little response.

The tour will demonstrate Russia’s “increasing interest in expanding its global influence, particularly on the continent Washington believes to be a traditional sphere of American influence,” said Yevgeny Volk, Moscow representative of the US Heritage Foundation, a research center.

In comments to RIA Novosti on Monday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov insisted Russian ties with South America and the Caribbean region were not aimed at “third countries” — a clear reference to the United States.

But Russian media have portrayed the naval exercises and recent Russian air force exercises in Venezuela as a direct response to US plans to extend a missile shield close to Russian borders in central Europe.

Venezuela’s purchase of a slew of Russian weapons have already prompted concern on the part of neighboring Colombia and the United States about the dangers of a South American arms race.

Russia’s Kommersant newspaper has reported that negotiations will be pursued during Medvedev’s visit on new Venezuelan arms purchases from Russia, possibly including air defense systems and fighter jets.

His visit to Cuba is sure to revive memories of Cold War rivalry, although the daily Kommersant reported in August that Cuba had reacted badly to Russian suggestions the island might host Russian bomber planes.

Hailing warm bilateral relations this month, Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque said that defense ties with Russia were aimed at “reinforcing the defensive potential of Cuba.”

Amid the Russian-US tensions, Medvedev’s encounter with Bush in Peru may prove chilly.

Moscow has all but written off coming to terms with the outgoing US administration on its missile defense plans, which Washington insists do not threaten Russia and are directed against “rogue states” such as Iran.

As well as pursuing military ties, Medvedev’s tour is sure to be aimed at expanding economic ties with South America, where Russian energy firms Gazprom, Lukoil and the British-Russian joint venture TNK-BP have been pushing projects in Venezuela.

But analysts remain sceptical about Russia’s goals in both Latin America and Asia.

Melbourne-based Asia specialist Damien Kingsbury said that Russia, despite its vast territory in the far east, was not seen as a significant Asian power and had damaged its cause by its military surge into Georgia in August.

Russia’s alliance with China remains “short-term”, said Kingsbury, of Deakin University, adding that after the August war, “states in the Asia-Pacific region would view Russia with a degree more caution.”

Reflecting on Russia’s dependence on energy exports to finance its ambitions, Volk concluded: “With the decrease in oil prices it will be much more difficult for Russia to play the role of superpower.”

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE DAILY TRIBUNE’ (Philippines)

Posted in BRASIL, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FOREIGN POLICIES, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, PERU, RUSSIA, THE ARMS INDUSTRY, VENEZUELA | Leave a Comment »

REFLEXIONES DEL COMPAÑERO FIDEL – LA REUNIÓN DE WASHINGTON (Cuba)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 15, 2008

Sábado 15 Noviembre 2008

Fidel Castro Ruz

Noviembre 14 de 2008

5 y 35 p.m.

Algunos de los gobiernos que nos apoyan, a juzgar por declaraciones recientes, no dejan de incluir en FIDEL CASTRO BY PEPITO JUNIOR CARLOSlas mismas que lo hacen para facilitar la transición en Cuba. ¿Transición hacia dónde? Hacia el capitalismo, único sistema en el que religiosamente creen. Ni una sola palabra expresan para reconocer el mérito de un pueblo que, sometido a casi medio siglo de crueles sanciones económicas y agresiones, defendió una causa revolucionaria que, unida a su moral y patriotismo, le dio fuerzas para resistir.

También olvidan que, después de las vidas ofrendadas y tanto sacrificio defendiendo la soberanía y la justicia, no se le puede ofrecer a Cuba en la otra orilla el capitalismo.

Le hacen guiños a Estados Unidos, soñando que los ayudará a resolver sus propios problemas económicos inyectándoles sumas fabulosas de monedas de papel a sus tambaleantes economías, que sostienen el intercambio desigual y abusivo con los países emergentes.

Sólo de esta forma pueden garantizarse las ganancias multimillonarias de Wall Street y los bancos de Estados Unidos. Los recursos naturales no renovables del planeta y la ecología ni siquiera se mencionan. No se demanda el cese de la carrera armamentista y la prohibición del uso posible y probable de armas de exterminio masivo.

Ninguno de los que participarán en la reunión, convocada precipitadamente por el actual Presidente de Estados Unidos, ha dicho una palabra sobre la ausencia de más de 150 Estados con iguales o peores problemas, que no tendrán derecho a decir una palabra sobre el orden financiero internacional, como propuso el Presidente pro tempore de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, Miguel D’Escoto, entre ellos la mayor parte de los países de América Latina, el Caribe, África, Asia y Oceanía.

Mañana se inicia la reunión del G-20 en Washington. Bush está de plácemes. Proclama que de la reunión espera un nuevo orden financiero internacional. Las instituciones creadas por Bretton Woods deben ser más transparentes, responsables y efectivas. Es lo único que admitiría. Para señalar la prosperidad de Cuba en el pasado, habló de que una vez estuvo sembrada de campos de caña de azúcar. No dijo, por cierto, que se cortaba a mano y el imperio nos arrebató la cuota establecida durante más de medio siglo, cuando la palabra socialismo no se había pronunciado todavía en nuestro país, aunque sí las de ¡Patria o Muerte!

Muchos sueñan que, con un simple cambio de mando en la jefatura del imperio, este sería más tolerante y menos belicoso. El desprecio por su actual gobernante conduce a ilusiones del probable cambio del sistema.

No se conoce todavía el pensamiento más íntimo del ciudadano que tomará el timón sobre el tema. Sería sumamente ingenuo creer que las buenas intenciones de una persona inteligente podrían cambiar lo que siglos de intereses y egoísmo han creado. La historia humana demuestra otra cosa.

Observemos con atención lo que dice cada cual en esa importante reunión financiera. Las noticias lloverán. Estaremos todos un poco mejor informados.


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PUBLISHED BY ‘VICTORIA’ (Cuba)

Posted in AFRICA, ASIA, CENTRAL AMERICA, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, G20, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, OCEANIA, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

MEDVEDEV PLANS TRIP TO CUBA ON LATIN AMERICAN TOUR LATER THIS MONTH

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 14, 2008

Published: November 14, 2008, 15:30

Agencies

Nice: Russian President Dmitry Medvedev will visit US foe Cuba on a tour of Latin American states later DIMITRI MEDEVEDEVthis month, his spokeswoman said on Friday.

“As part of his trip to Latin America … this month, the president will also visit Cuba,” spokeswoman Natalya Timakova told reporters on the sidelines of a European Union-Russia summit in the French resort of Nice.

Russia has been building ties with Latin American leaders who are cool towards the United States, a drive the Kremlin said is about trade but which some analysts say is designed to signal to Washington that Russia is once again a world power.

Medvedev had been scheduled only to visit Venezuela, Brazil and Peru on his tour of the region. His spokeswoman did not give an exact date for the Cuban leg of the trip.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘GULF NEWS’ (Dubai)

Posted in BRASIL, CENTRAL AMERICA, COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES, CUBA, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, LATIN AMERICA, PERU, RUSSIA, VENEZUELA | Leave a Comment »