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AIR CANADA CUTS 375 JOBS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 25, 2009

Sunday January 25, 2009

Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE STAR’ (Malaysia)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE STAR’ (Malaysia)

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Posted in AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, CANADA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, RECESSION, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE WORK MARKET, TOURISM INDUSTRIES, UNEMPLOYMENT | Leave a Comment »

NEWCOMER TO KEYS IS UNWELCOME, UNCOUTH – THE NON-NATIVE LIONFISH HAS CAUSED ECOLOGICAL HAVOC EVERYWHERE IT HAS SPREAD – NOW IT HAS REACHED THE KEYS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 19, 2009

Saturday, 01.17.09

by Cammy Clark

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MIAMI HERALD’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MIAMI HERALD’ (USA)

Posted in COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FISH AND SEA PRODUCTS, FISHERIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES - USA, MACROECONOMY, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, TOURISM INDUSTRIES, USA | Leave a Comment »

BLOODY ASSAULT AGAINST SOUTH AFRICA’S RHINOS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 11, 2009

January 10 2009 at 01:11PM

by Sheree Bega

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE INDEPENDENT ONLINE’ (South Africa)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE INDEPENDENT ONLINE’ (South Africa)

Posted in COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, INTERNATIONAL, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, SOUTH AFRICA, TOURISM INDUSTRIES | 1 Comment »

FLORIDA’S NATURAL BOUNTY BEING LOOTED (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 11, 2009

Sunday, 01.11.09

by Carl Hiassen

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MIAMI HERALD’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MIAMI HERALD’ (USA)

Posted in BANKING SYSTEM - USA, BANKRUPTCIES - USA, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, INDUSTRIES - USA, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, TOURISM INDUSTRIES, USA | Leave a Comment »

ATIENZA SAYS: NO TREES TO BE CUT FOR SUBIC CASINO (Philippines)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 9, 2009

20:01:00 01/08/2009

by Alcuin Papa – Philippine Daily Inquirer

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER’ (Philippines)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER’ (Philippines)

Posted in BANKING SYSTEMS, CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, PHILIPPINES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, TOURISM INDUSTRIES | 1 Comment »

CUBA: NICKEL AGAIN EARNED MORE THAN TOURISM IN ’08

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 7, 2009

Mon, Jan. 05, 2009 08:15PM

The Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE NEWS OBSERVER’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE NEWS OBSERVER’ (USA)

Posted in COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MINING INDUSTRIES, NICKEL, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, TOURISM INDUSTRIES | Leave a Comment »

NINE FOR 2009: HOW IS THE TRAVEL INDUSTRY FACING UP TO WHAT LOOKS LIKE A TOUGH YEAR? – THE INDEPENDENT TRAVELLER SOUGHT THE VIEWS OF NINE KEY PLAYERS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 4, 2009

Saturday, 3 January 2009

Interviews by Sophie Lam and Ben Ross

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE INDEPENDENT’ (UK)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE INDEPENDENT’ (UK)

Posted in AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, RECESSION, TOURISM INDUSTRIES | Leave a Comment »

WEATHERING THE STORM – Syrians are quickly realising that the impact of the global financial crisis will be larger than first thought. In an age of globalisation, no country is an island

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 13, 2008

Issue: December 2008

by Brooke Anderson

PUBLISHED BY ‘SYRIA TODAY’

Despite government assurances that their country will weather the storm engulfing markets around the world, Syrians are quickly realising that in the 21st century, no country is immune from a global economic meltdown.

“No country can say it’s unaffected,” Samira al-Masalmeh, managing editor of local affairs at the independent Syrian daily newspaper Al-Watan and the economic weekly Al-Iqtissadiya, said. “It’s true, we don’t have direct economic relations with the United States, but the crisis is affecting Europe. We work with Europe and Asia, so there is an indirect effect on Syria.”

Syria will, however, weather the storm better than most countries, Masalmeh said. “For the most part, 70 percent of investment in Syria is from inside the country,” she said. “Syria has a strong and diversified internal economy that doesn’t depend on oil. We don’t have a stock market.”

The global financial crisis, which originated in the US banking system, hits Syria at a time when the country is opening up its economy after more than 40 years of socialist rule. Many in Syria now believe the country needs to quickly learn the lessons emerging from more developed economies now battling recession. “I hope Syria will learn a lesson from America and it will put into place better laws protecting investment,” Masalmeh said.

Far from the epicentre

To date, the Syrian government has taken a cautious view of the crisis. “The Syrian economy is stable and solid and the Syrian pound is strong and protected,” Deputy Prime Minister for Economic Affairs Abdullah al-Dardari said in October. “Syria has an independent banking system. In addition, the Syrian pound has a higher interest rate than other currencies.”

Dardari also said deposits in Syrian banks have increased since the beginning of the crisis because of the stability of the local banking sector. “The government is working day and night for the stability of the economy and to serve the nation and the citizen,” he said, adding there is “no reason at all to be scared or worried”.

Likewise, Syrian Minister of Finance Muhammad al-Hussein has emphasised the limited impact the global financial crisis will have on Syria. “The worldwide financial crisis could have an effect on Syria, but the government- is working with President Bashar al-Assad to make sure the effect is limited,” Hussein told the state daily newspaper Al-Thawra. He said Syria was “far away from the epicentre of the earthquake”.

Indirect impact

One government official striking a different note is Duraid Dargham, head of the government-run Commercial Bank of Syria, the country’s largest bank. In a full-page article published in the Tishreen newspaper in early October, Dargham said the danger posed to Syria by the global financial crisis was real and significant. “The economic crisis will have a big effect on Syria,” he wrote.

Dargham said Syria’s economy would take two main hits. The first will come in a decline in both the price and global demand for oil. Since the crisis erupted, the price of oil has fallen from a record SYP 6,510 (USD 140) per barrel to around SYP 2,557 (USD 55) a barrel and the slide is expected to continue. It’s a drop which could now make growth estimates for 2009 optimistic and will further widen the country’s budget deficit, a fact Hussein pointed out at a recent banking conference.

The second blow will come from remittances from Syrians living abroad who now number a massive 18m; Syria’s internal population is little more than 19m. On average, Syrian expatriates, many of whom earn high wages in the Gulf, inject SYP 37.2bn (USD 800m) annually in remittances into the Syrian economy. With many parts of the world entering recession and unemployment rising, this stream of foreign funds is expected to slow.

Jihad Yazigi, editor of the English-language economic newsletter The Syria Report, said Syria’s links to the Gulf markets make it vulnerable to the ongoing global economic turmoil. “A lot of money comes [to Syria] from the Gulf,” he said. “Some Syrians could be made redundant in the Gulf so we could see a slower pace of remittances and that could lead to more unemployment here.”

Yazigi also points to the possibility of foreign direct investment flows slowing over the next year. Rather than the dramatic blows being landed on the world’s leading economies like the US and Japan, Yazigi said the impact on Syria would come incrementally. “We haven’t seen anything yet, because the impact is indirect,” he said. “It won’t be as dramatic as the price of stocks. It will be an interesting sign if we see the delay of one to two big Gulf investments in Syria. Investors have to prioritise when they want to invest and Syria is not a priority for them. We haven’t felt it yet, but we will. It won’t be a big impact, but there will be an impact.”

Masalmeh points to tourism, an increasingly important money spinner in Syria, as another area likely to be negatively impacted as people around the world tighten their spending habits and cancel overseas holiday plans. “The crisis will affect tourism because there’ll be less money to spend,” she said. “If there’s no money, there’s no tourism.”

Feeling the squeeze

One Syrian company is already seeing the impact of the global financial crisis firsthand. At Muhanna for Sweets, a Damascus-based family sweets business founded in 1935, chief executive officer Mahmoud Muhanna said the global financial crisis could not come at a worse time. The company is already battling the impact of a cut in fuel subsidies which has seen the price of raw materials rise. As a result, the company has had to increase the prices of its goods – 30 to 40 percent for some sweets and 100 percent for others – at a time when foreign buyers in America and Europe are looking to save money. “All of the prices of raw materials – sugar, fat, and pistachios – have increased,” Muhanna said.

Three years ago, exports made up 40 percent of all sales at Muhanna for Sweets. Now they account for just 25 percent of business. Twenty-five percent of total exports go to the US, 5 to 10 percent go to the Gulf, while the rest go to Europe.

Muhanna does not expect any growth in his exports to US and European markets in the short term. As such the Gulf and local market will become all the more important. He said his company has been helped by the steady flow of tourists in the past several years, business travellers from the Gulf and the opening of new hotels such as the Four Seasons. But it’s a customer base that might not be so reliable in the coming months, he admits.

To counter a decline in exports, Muhanna is already thinking of a plan B: creating a line of less expensive sweets. Still, he doesn’t appear to be too worried about the financial turmoil creating a crisis in sweets consumption. “No matter what happens, people always buy Arab sweets,” he said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘SYRIA TODAY’

Posted in ASIA, BANKING SYSTEMS, CENTRAL BANKS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, EUROPE, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FOREIGN POLICIES, FOREIGN POLICIES - USA, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES, INDUSTRIES - USA, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, ISLAMIC BANKS, JAPAN, PETROL, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, STOCK MARKETS, THE ARABIAN PENINSULA, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, TOURISM INDUSTRIES, USA | Leave a Comment »

CUBAN TOURISM SURGES AS REST OF CARIBBEAN STALLS – Tourism In Cuba Up Nearly 11 Percent Despite 3 Hurricanes

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 10, 2008

HAVANA, Dec. 8, 2008

The Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘CBS NEWS’ (USA)

(AP) Cuba’s vacation industry has remained as hot as the tropical sun here, even as the world economic crisis sparks cancellations and layoffs elsewhere in the Caribbean.

The communist country says it’s booked solid through December and expects a record 2.34 million visitors this year _ largely because global financial woes have so far been softer on Canada, its top source of visitors.

Luck also played a role: While the island suffered three devastating hurricanes, its key tourist sites were largely spared. And where beachfront resorts did get hit, the tourist-hungry government has made sure to repair hotels _ in some cases even before damaged homes and infrastructure. Tourism is Cuba’s second-largest source of foreign income, behind nickel production.

So while other islands in the region are laying off hotel workers and suspending construction of new property, Cuban resorts are gearing up for a strong season.

“We’ve had a few cancellations, but overall our numbers are still strong,” said David Gregori of WowCuba, a travel agency in Charlottetown, Canada, that specializes in bicycle trips and other Cuba tours. “People still like to get away. They might try to save some money while doing it, but they’re still traveling.”

The number of foreign visitors has swelled nearly 11 percent this year, making up for 4 and 3 percent declines in 2006 and 2007, government figures show.

Officials offer no explanation for those slower years. But tour operators blame the island’s low returning-visitor rates: Some tourists complain of poor service, crumbling infrastructure and lousy food, indicative of a communist system where shortages are common and state employees are unaccustomed to putting customer service first.

Still, the island is often cheaper than its subtropical neighbors, because many foreigners buy all-inclusive packages offering dozens of direct flights from Europe and Canada to airports all over Cuba, as well deep discounts on hotels, food and booze.

Others are enticed by the prospect of seeing one of only five communist countries left on the planet.

“A lot of people who are going for simple fly-and-flop holiday, and there are others who are going for history and culture, dancing, music,” said Julia Hendry, marketing director for Europe and the United Kingdom of the Bahamas-based Caribbean Trade Organization. Cuba has both, she said, “whether it’s swimming and beach or the excitement of Old Havana and Cuban history.”

About 35 percent of this year’s tourists have been Canadian, with 635,000 visiting through September, one-fifth more than in the same period last year. Canada’s economy has not suffered the same losses now sapping the savings of homeowners in the U.S.

Russian tourists rose 40 percent to top 28,000 thru September, and Cuban Tourism Minister Manuel Marrero traveled to Moscow last month to further promote his country.

Visitors from Britain, Italy, Spain and Germany, the top suppliers of tourists after Canada, declined between 3 and 5 percent respectively, however.

Washington’s trade embargo prohibits Americans from visiting, though island immigration records show about 41,000 came last year, many presumably without permission. But not relying on U.S. tourists may now be a blessing.

“Canadians are going to keep coming, especially with snow at home,” said Helen Lueke of Sherwood Park, Canada, who has vacationed in Havana about once a year for decades.

Alexis Trujillo, Cuba’s deputy secretary of tourism, predicted full bookings at least through next summer.

“There’s no doubt tourism is always sensitive to everything,” he said of global economic turmoil. “But we don’t think that for Cuba that will mean an important decrease.”

Tourism generated $2.2 billion for Cuba in 2007. The government has announced no plans to delay a $185 million plan to upgrade more than 200 resorts and build 50 boutique hotels by 2010 _ nt even after Hurricanes Gustav, Ike and Paloma hit within two months, causing more than $10 billion in damages and crippling farms and infrastructure across the countryside.

Construction crews assigned to vacation properties in Havana and elsewhere have largely continued working as normal since the storms.

In the eastern province of Holguin, the island’s No. 3 tourist destination after Havana and the beach resort of Varadero, officials prioritized hotel repairs, trucking in workers to rebuild beachfront resorts. Holguin expects about 270,000 foreigners this year, about the same as 2007, despite scores of hurricane-related cancellations.

Havana’s decaying yet picturesque historic district saw little damage, as did Varadero, 90 miles (140 kilometers) to the east, where white sand and warm, see-through surf has enticed everyone from Fidel Castro to Al Capone. A record million visitors are expected to stay in the town’s 7,000 hotel rooms, which range in price from about $120 to $350 per night, with meals and open bar included.

Though European tour operators say sales have slowed since the financial crisis deepened in October, they expect trips to Cuba and some other Caribbean destinations to stay strong through the winter. Europeans are putting off short, side trips closer to home, but many families are still willing to splurge on once-a-year trips to the tropics, Hendry said.

“We have noticed that all-inclusive markets, where travelers can budget in advance, seem to be doing relative well. Cuba is quite well-populated with that sort of property,” she said.

The industry could get another boast if President-elect Barack Obama keeps campaign promises to ease restrictions on Cuban Americans who want to visit their relatives on the island. Currently, those with family here can only come once every three years.

Nelson Gonzalez, a 56-year-old physical therapist, said his mechanic brother in Miami last came to visit in 2007. But his brother called the morning after the U.S. election to say he was reserving a seat on one of the many special charters that fly from the U.S. to Havana for the last week in January _ confident Obama will ease family travel rules immediately after his Jan. 20 inauguration.

“When your family members reach a certain age, you don’t know if in three more years everyone will still be here,” said Gonzalez, who lives with his 80-year-old parents.

Though visiting family members spend less than tourists, Gregori said many Cuban Americans use his company to book rental cars in advance of visiting relatives.

But “if you want to rent a car in Havana in December, I don’t have any,” he said. “They’ve been sold out for months, and every year they get sold out earlier and earlier.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘CBS NEWS’ (USA)

Posted in BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA -(DEC. 2008/JAN. 2009), CANADA, COMMERCE, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, EUROPE, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FOREIGN POLICIES, FOREIGN POLICIES - USA, GERMANY, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, ITALY, NATIONAL WORK FORCES, RECESSION, RUSSIA, SPAIN, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, THE WORK MARKET, THE WORKERS, TOURISM INDUSTRIES, UNITED KINGDOM, USA | Leave a Comment »

DURANTE O PRIMEIRO SEMESTRE DO CORRENTE ANO INVESTIMENTOS NO TURISMO ATINGIRAM 168 MILHÕES DE USD – Apesar do “ligeiro aumento” nos investimentos verificados no sector, os operadores consideram que tais deixaram a desejar, tendo em conta as reais potencialidades que o país tem para atrair mais investimentos, dizem os agentes económicos – Governo dúvida do que está a fazer para levar avante o turismo na óptica dos operadores e das comunidades locais “Polícias de Trânsito e Municipais de Maputo, Matola e Xai-Xai, são os principais empecilhos ao desenvolvimento do turismo no sul do país” – acusa José da Cunha, da Associação do Turismo em Inhambane (Moçambique)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 15, 2008

2008-11-14 05:09:00

por Bernardo Álvaro

Maputo (Canal de Moçambique) – Os investimentos no sector do turismo em Moçambique, totalizaram durante o primeiro semestre do presente ano, os cerca de 168 milhões de dólares norte-americanos, mercê do registo de um ligeiro aumento em cerca de 5 por cento de chegadas de turistas internacionais, segundo dados da «Terconsult», uma empresa nacional de consultoria.

De acordo com Rui Monteiro, da Terconsult, o consumo médio a nível nacional por pessoa, tem-se situado em 130 dólares numa estadia média de 1,7 dias (um dia e sete horas), o que é irrisório. Por isso entende que devia-se aumentar a receita média para 305 dólares por pessoa.

Apesar da ligeira subida, alguns operadores do ramo, consideram que os investimentos neste sector estão longe do que seria de desejar, se tivermos em conta as potencialidades turísticas que o país tem para atrair mais investimentos, mas que não tem conseguido devido a vários constrangimentos e alguma falta de capacidade por parte do Governo, através do sector de tutela para chamar mais investidores, bem como os próprios turistas.

Quando aproveitado, a turismo segundo Monteiro seria um instrumento chave para o tal almejado alivio (não combate como se costuma dizer por aí) da pobreza absoluta e da promoção socioeconómica, uma vez que “cruza muitas das necessidades primárias” da população.

Como o turismo instiga a procura de produtos locais, o responsável da «Terconsult», entende que tal poderia contribuir para a propagação do emprego, bem como a criação de uma cultura de turismo doméstico como estratégia de aumentar o rendimento integral.

Considera-se que em Moçambique, os preços dos transportes aéreos que deveriam ser catalizadores do turismo, são ainda proibitivos, sendo que, fraca é também a divulgação da gastronomia nacional, do património histórico-cultural e a locação de serviços complementares nos locais turísticos como o desporto, por parte do Governo ou seja o ministério de tutela, segundo observou Rui Monteiro. Outrossim há falta no país de restaurantes com comida típica da região austral de África onde estamos localizados.

Para Rui Monteiro, pequenos projectos de turismo bem planificados e organizados, poderiam melhorar a governação local, os recursos naturais, a conservação da biodiversidade e outros objectivos importantes para o desenvolvimento.

“Na verdade quando operamos legitimamente, somos penalizados pelo permanente escrutínio que é imposto e as inúmeras inspecções, ao invés de uma inspecção única que seria benéfico para a classe empresarial”, lamenta Monteiro.

Aliás, até o próprio Governo reconhece as suas fraquezas no desenvolvimento do turismo no país, a avaliar pelas dúvidas que a vice-ministra da Agricultura de Moçambique, Catarina Pajume, levanta quando considera que o Ministério do Turismo deveria garantir que os produtos consumidos nas estancias turísticas sejam sobretudo nacionais.

“O Ministério do Turismo devia garantir que os produtos consumidos nas instâncias turísticas são sobretudo nacionais. Não sabemos se faz isso ou não, porque o que assistimos é que muitos estrangeiros entram no país com produtos estrangeiros para consumirem aqui no nosso país”, afirmou Pajume, acrescentando que também cabe ao Ministério das Obras Públicas e Habitação garantir infra-estruturas como estradas por exemplo, para o melhor acesso as zonas turísticas, bem como para o escoamento de produtos, o que parece não vem acontecendo com alguma eficiência.

Mas também o fornecimento da industria agrícola, que seria um dos principais sectores de suporte na operação da indústria hoteleira em Moçambique, “actualmente é de fraca qualidade, inconstante e inadequado aos volumes requeridos”.

Por isso Monteiro propõe a necessidade de capacitar a industria agrícola para as actuais exigências do turismo por forma a que se possa começar por consumir produtos nacionais nas estâncias turísticas e noutros serviços conexos.

Entretanto José da Cunha, da Associação do Turismo de Inhambane, considera que nas cidades de Maputo, Matola e Xai-Xai, os grandes obstáculos ao desenvolvimento do turismo um pouco por toda a região sul do país, são os agentes das Polícias de Transito e Municipais das três cidades que se constituem corredores de passagem de turistas. Isso devido à sua “ desonrosa actuação”, para com os turistas quando vão com destino aos locais turísticos, quer para lazer, como para explorar oportunidades de investimentos.

Segundo Da Cunha, os turistas sempre que passam da Matola, ou chegam a Maputo como ponto para alcançarem outras regiões ou zonas turísticas como Inhambane, uma das províncias da região sul com mais potencialidades, correm sérios riscos. Os Polícias em referências tudo fazem para intimidar, extorquir, revistar e pedir subornos, através de várias artimanhas. Envergonham o País e fazem com que se passe para o exterior uma imagem péssima das instituições. Fazem autênticas emboscadas aos turistas para lhes extorquirem dinheiro e valores. Uma vergonha que o ministro do Turismo conhece, os governadores provinciais conhecem, os comandantes das corporações de polícia conhecem, os chefes de esquadras conhecem, os comandantes das brigadas de trânsito conhecem, há anos, mas se têm revelado incapazes de por termo a tais práticas desonrosas.

Em 2007, as chegadas internacionais a Moçambique atingiram cerca de 1.100.000 (um milhão e cem mil), dos quais 650 mil foram chegadas turísticas, resultando em receitas provenientes do turismo internacional, que totalizaram 163,4 milhões de dólares norte-americanos.

Moçambique tem uma área de conservação de 252.535,4 Km2 (duzentos e cinquenta e dois mil, quinhentos e trinta e cinco) quilómetros quadrados, o equivalente a 31,6 por cento da superfície total do país em território nacional.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

PUBLISHED BY ‘CANAL DE MOÇAMBIQUE’

Posted in ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, INTERNATIONAL, MOZAMBIQUE, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, TOURISM INDUSTRIES | Leave a Comment »