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OBAMA COMMITTED TO ‘GREEN’ ECONOMY (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 28, 2009

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

by Xinhua

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MANILA TIMES’ (Philippines)

LOS ANGELES: The Obama administration is pushing forward with plans to aggressively limit greenhouse gas emissions PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMAand fight global warming, US media reported.

The plans would include a cap-and-trade initiative to limit greenhouse gases and raise the cost of pumping more carbon into the atmosphere, the Los Angeles Times said Sunday (Monday in Manila).

Under the initiative, the government would set limits on carbon emissions by power plants, factories and other installations, but allow those who emit more to buy or trade permits with companies and facilities that emitted less than the prescribed limit, according to the newspaper.

But the move would amount to a tax, raising energy costs. And several independent studies have suggested that emissions limits would only increase energy price and be a drag on economic growth, at least in the short term.

Despite such fears, the Obama government believed that a “clean energy economy” move would spur competition and promote investment in renewable alternatives to imported oil.

Two-pronged plan

The administration is expected to move forward with a two-pronged effort to stimulate renewable energy supplies and ensure demand for the megawatts they would produce, the newspaper reported.

The first part is to invest heavily in wind power, solar power and biofuels through the massive stimulus bill, while the second is to help those forms of energy compete with cheaper fossil fuels by pumping up fossil fuel costs to reflect the potential economic damage from global warming, according to the paper.

“If we don’t put a price on carbon,” said Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer, chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee. “We’ll never get these clean energy sources on line.”

Instead of dragging the economy, the plan to limit greenhouse emissions would stimulate the economy and “allow polluters to transition from a high-polluting environment to a low-polluting environment,” said Andy Stevenson, a former hedge fund manager who is now a finance advisor for the Natural Resources Defense Council in New York City.

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MANILA TIMES’ (Philippines)

Posted in AEOLIC, AGRICULTURE, BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA -(DEC. 2008/JAN. 2009), BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECOLOGICAL AGRICULTURE, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, ETHANOL, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, GLOBAL WARMING, HEALTH SAFETY, HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES - USA, MACROECONOMY, NATURAL GAS, POLLUTION, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, RESTRUCTURING OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR, STATE TARIFFS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE PRESIDENCY - USA, USA | Leave a Comment »

BIOFUEL IMPACT ON FARM PRICES OVERPLAYED (Philippines)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 25, 2009

JANUARY 24, 2008

Malaya

PUBLISHED BY ‘MALAYA’ (Philippines)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘MALAYA’ (Philippines)

Posted in AGRICULTURE, BIOFUELS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, GLOBAL WARMING, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, PHILIPPINES, RECESSION, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

NEVES WRAPS UP VISIT TO CUBA WITH MEETING WITH RAUL CASTRO (Cape Verde and Cuba)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 22, 2009

20-01-09

A Semana

PUBLISHED BY ‘A SEMANA’ (Cape Verde)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘A SEMANA’ (Cape Verde)

Posted in AGRICULTURE, BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, CAPE VERDE, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CUBA, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FOREIGN POLICIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RESTRUCTURING OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, VEGETABLE OILS | Leave a Comment »

GOVERNO PREPARA PROJETO DE LEI QUE PREVÊ FIM DAS QUEIMADAS NOS CANAVIAIS (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 22, 2009

Quarta-feira, 21/01/2009 – 20:58

Jornal da Mídia

PUBLISHED BY ‘JORNAL DA MÍDIA’ (Brazil)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘JORNAL DA MÍDIA’ (Brazil)

Posted in A QUESTÃO AGRÁRIA, AGRICULTURE, BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS, BIOFUELS, CIDADANIA, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CRIMES AMBIENTAIS - BRASIL, CRIMES EMPRESARIAIS, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, DESENVOLVIMENTO SUSTENTÁVEL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, EXPANSÃO AGRÍCOLA, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, GLOBAL WARMING, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MINISTÉRIO DA AGRICULTURA, PECUÁRIA E ABASTECIMENTO, MINISTÉRIO DO MEIO AMBIENTE, O PODER EXECUTIVO FEDERAL, O PODER JUDICIÁRIO, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, SUGAR | Leave a Comment »

VERENIUM PLAN CELLULOSIC ETHANOL FACILITY IN FLORIDA (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 20, 2009

1/19/2009 6:37:10 PM GMT

EnergyCurrent

PUBLISHED BY ‘EnergyCurrent News Digest’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘EnergyCurrent News Digest’ (USA)

Posted in BANKING SYSTEM - USA, BANKRUPTCIES - USA, BIOFUELS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ETHANOL, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES, INDUSTRIES - USA, RECESSION, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, USA | 1 Comment »

ALTERNATIVE-ENERGY COMPANIES GROW EVEN AS OTHERS FALTER INQUIRIES – SALES AND FUNDING RISE IN ANTICIPATION OF NEW REGULATIONS AND SPENDING FROM OBAMA ADMINISTRATION

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 17, 2009

January 13, 2009

by Simona Covel

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE WALL STREET JOURNAL’

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE WALL STREET JOURNAL’

Posted in AEOLIC, BANKING SYSTEM - USA, BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA -(DEC. 2008/JAN. 2009), BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY, HYDROGEN - FUEL CELLS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES - USA, MACROECONOMY, NATURAL GAS, PUBLIC SECTOR AND STATE OWNED ENTERPRISES, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, SOLAR, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, USA | Leave a Comment »

OIL EXECS SEE GROWTH IN RENEWABLE ENERGY

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 12, 2009

Mon, Jan. 12, 2009

by H. Josef Hebert – Associated Press Writer

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE WICHITA EAGLE’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE WICHITA EAGLE’ (USA)

Posted in AEOLIC, BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, GLOBAL WARMING, HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY, HYDROGEN - FUEL CELLS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MACROECONOMY, POLLUTION, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, RESTRUCTURING OF PRIVATE COMPANIES, RESTRUCTURING OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR, SOLAR, STATE TARIFFS, STOCK MARKETS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE WORK MARKET | Leave a Comment »

CONTINENTAL FLIGHT POWERED WITH BIOFUEL TAKES OFF – CONTINENTAL BECOMES FIRST US CARRIER TO MAKE DEMO FLIGHT POWERED PARTIALLY WITH BIOFUEL (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 8, 2009

Houston, Jan. 7, 2009

Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘CBS NEWS’ (USA)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘CBS NEWS’ (USA)

Posted in AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, BIOFUELS, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES - USA, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, USA | Leave a Comment »

RENEWABLE ENERGY FIRM AWARDED 3 DEALS (Philippines)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on January 3, 2009

Saturday, January 3, 2009

by Myrna M. Velasco

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MANILA BULLETIN’ (Philippines)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE MANILA BULLETIN’ (Philippines)

Posted in BIOFUELS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, PHILIPPINES, RECESSION, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, STOCK MARKETS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

NZ AIRLINE JETLINER OPERATES PARTLY ON VEGETABLE OIL – JATROPHA: BOEING AND VIRGIN ATLANTIC CARRIED OUT A SIMILAR TEST FLIGHT THAT INCLUDED A BIOFUEL MIXTURE THAT WAS DISMISSED AS A PUBLICITY STUNT BY ENVIRONMENTALISTS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 31, 2008

Wednesday, Dec 31, 2008

Associated Press – Wellington

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE TAIPEI TIMES’ (Formosa – Taiwan)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE TAIPEI TIMES’ (Formosa – Taiwan)

Posted in AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, BIOFUELS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MACROECONOMY, NEW ZEALAND, O BIODIESEL, RECESSION, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, TRANSPORT INDUSTRIES, VEGETABLE OILS | 1 Comment »

AIR NZ COMPLETES BIOFUEL TEST FLIGHT (New Zealand)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 31, 2008

Tue, Dec. 30, 2008

Energy Current

PUBLISHED BY ‘ENERGY CURRENT’

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PUBLISHED BY ‘ENERGY CURRENT’

Posted in AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY, BIOFUELS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, NEW ZEALAND, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

EMBRAPA DISCUTE BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS COM O PARAGUAI (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 23, 2008

19/12/2008 às 09:21

Da Redação com Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste

PUBLISHED BY ‘CANAL DA CANA’ (Brazil)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘CANAL DA CANA’ (Brazil)

Posted in BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS, BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, BRASIL, DEFESA DO MEIO AMBIENTE - BRASIL, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, ETANOL, ETHANOL, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FOREIGN POLICIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, O BIODIESEL, PARAGUAY, POLÍTICA EXTERNA - BRASIL, RECESSION, RELAÇÕES DIPLOMÁTICAS - BRASIL, RELAÇÕES INTERNACIONAIS - BRASIL | Leave a Comment »

CDI APROVA INSTALAÇÃO EM MS DE PROJETOS DE R$ 492 MILHÕES EM BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 23, 2008

19/12/2008 às 09:07

por Anderson Viegas – Da Redação

PUBLISHED BY ‘CANAL DA CANA’ (Brazil)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘CANAL DA CANA’ (Brazil)

Posted in A QUESTÃO ENERGÉTICA, BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS, BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, BRASIL, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, ETANOL, ETHANOL, EXPANSÃO AGRÍCOLA, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, EXPANSÃO INDUSTRIAL, FLUXO DE CAPITAIS, INTERNATIONAL, O BIODIESEL | Leave a Comment »

TURBOSONIC WINS US$1 MILLION ORDER FROM BIOFUEL PRODUCER

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 18, 2008

12/17/2008 8:32:26 AM

NEWSTAR FINANCIAL INC

PUBLISHED BY ‘STOCKHOUSE’

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PUBLISHED BY ‘STOCKHOUSE’

Posted in BIOFUELS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIES, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

SETOR DE COMBUSTÍVEIS FECHA 2008 COM RECORDE DE VENDAS (Brazil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 18, 2008

Terça-feira, 16 de Dezembro de 2008 13:11

Nielmar de Oliveira – da Agência Brasil

PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘CAMPO GRANDE NEWS’ (Brazil)

Posted in A QUESTÃO ENERGÉTICA, BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, BRASIL, COMÉRCIO - BRASIL, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIA - BRASIL, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ETHANOL, EXPANSÃO ECONÔMICA, FUELS, GASOLINE, INTERNATIONAL | Leave a Comment »

CONERGY, GE TO POUR $250M INTO ASIA-PACIFIC CLEAN POWER

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 17, 2008

December 15, 2008

by David Ehrlich – GigaOm

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE NEW YORK TIMES’

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PUBLISHED BY ‘THE NEW YORK TIMES’

Posted in AEOLIC, ASIA, BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, GERMANY, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES, INDUSTRIES - USA, INTERNATIONAL, NATURAL GAS, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, SOLAR, STOCK MARKETS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, USA | Leave a Comment »

AUSTRALIA BRINGS FORWARD A$500 MILLION GREEN ENERGY FUND

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 14, 2008

December 14, 2008

Editing by Anshuman Daga

PUBLISHED BY ‘SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN’

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd called for a “solar revolution” on Sunday as he unveiled plans to bring forward a A$500 million (US$329 million) fund to promote renewable energy in a bid to stimulate the economy.

Speaking just a day before a key announcement on Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions targets, Rudd said the fund’s timescale would be brought forward from the original six-year plan to the next 18 months.

“It’s good for jobs. It’s good for stimulus. It’s good for acting on climate change,” Rudd said of the move. “It’s time for Australia to begin a solar revolution, a renewable energy revolution and we’ve got to fund it for the future.”

Rudd made the announcement at the Queensland town of Windorah, where a new solar energy plant is expected to produce around 360,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year and provide the town’s daytime power needs.

The prime minister said A$100 million would be released by June 30 next year, with the remaining A$400 million to be released in the following 12 months.

The only condition, he said in an accompanying statement, was “availability of suitable demonstration projects.” Guidelines would be released early in 2009, the statement said.

The Renewable Energy Fund, which also includes work on biofuels development and geothermal drilling, was set up to help cut the cost of developing technologies that might play a key role in energy supply and security over the next few decades.

The fund was an election commitment by the ruling Labor party in last year’s election, in which Rudd defeated conservative predecessor John Howard. During the campaign Rudd set a target that 20 percent of Australia’s energy should be from renewable sources by 2020.

A key ‘white paper’ policy document is due on Monday setting out Australia’s official targets for emissions cuts and plans for carbon trading. Australia is widely expected to adopt a target of a 10 percent cut from 2000 levels by 2020.

Although Rudd has been applauded by environmentalists for his decision for Australia to join the Kyoto protocol, they also say Canberra’s actions on reducing greenhouse gas emissions have so far been inadequate.

The statement follows a UN climate change conference in Poland, seen as preparation for a major one in Copenhagen next year.

(A$1=US$0.66)

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PUBLISHED BY ‘SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN’

Posted in AGRICULTURE, AUSTRALIA, BIOFUELS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MACROECONOMY, RECESSION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS | Leave a Comment »

EU AGREES $260BN ECONOMY PLAN

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 12, 2008

Friday, December 12, 2008 15:17 Mecca time, 12:17 GMT

PUBLISHED BY ‘AL JAZEERA’ (Qatar)

European Union leaders have agreed a $260bn stimulus package designed to dig the continent’s troubled economies out of recession.

The deal, which see each EU French President Nicolas Sarkozy, right, shares a word with German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a round table meeting at an EU summit in Brussels, Friday Dec. 12, 2008. European Union leaders continue their two days of talks aimed at sealing a final accord on their climate change package to cut emissions by 20 percent by 2020member invest on average the equivalent of 1.5 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) into their economies in order to temper the impact of a global recession, was reached on Friday at a two-day summit in the Belgian capital Brussels.

“What Europe has proved unanimously today is that it is ready to act in a united way to deal with the global downturn,” Gordon Brown, Britain’s prime minister, said.

“We will continue to reject the do-nothing approach and we will not stand by and let the recession take its course.”

Ahead of the summit, Germany had expressed reservations about ploughing so much public money into the economy and resisted pressure to contribute more than what it judged necessary to revive the German economy again.

Officials revised earlier versions of the conclusions to say the package should be worth “about” 1.5 per cent of GDP rather than “at least” 1.5 per cent as seen in an earlier draft.

Climate change

After securing an agreement in the morning for Ireland to submit a stalled EU reform treaty to a second referendum next year, the 27 leaders were also hoping to reach more common ground on climate change as the day progressed.

Copies of a draft agreement indicated the leaders should commit themselves to warding off the threat of a “recessionary spiral” with the stimulus package and an ambitious climate package.

“In these exceptional circumstances, Europe will act in a united, strong, rapid and decisive manner to avoid a recessionary spiral and sustain economic activity and employment,” the draft conclusion said.

“It will mobilise all the instruments available to it and act in a concerted manner to maximise the effect of the measures taken by the [European] Union and by each member state.”

The EU’s climate-energy package, the “20-20-20” deal, seeks to decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2020, make 20 per cent energy savings and bring renewable energy sources up to 20 per cent of total energy use.

Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, said: “The member states still have essential negotiations but I am cautiously optimistic that good conclusions can be reached here and send an important signal” to an international climate conference in Copehagen next December.

Under Ireland’s referendum deal, a new referendum will be held by November 2009 on the controversial treaty in exchange for guarantees on key issues including an assurance that it does not lose its EU commissioner.

Irish voters rejected the treaty, designed to streamline EU decision-making and institutions, at a first referendum in June.

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Posted in AEOLIC, BANKING SYSTEMS, BELGIUM, BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, CENTRAL BANKS, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, EUROPE, EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FOREIGN POLICIES, FRANCE, GERMANY, HYDROGEN - FUEL CELLS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, IRELAND, NATURAL GAS, RECESSION, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, SOLAR, THE EUROPEAN UNION, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, UNITED KINGDOM | Leave a Comment »

ENDING AUSTRALIA’S OIL ADDICTION – AS AUSTRALIAN OIL PRODUCTION SLOWS AND CONSUMPTION GROWS, OUR ECONOMIC, ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY DEPENDS ON URGENTLY DEVELOPING FOSSIL FUEL ALTERNATIVES

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 5, 2008

Last Updated – December 04th 2008

by John Mathews

PUBLISHED BY ‘CORPORATE CITIZEN’ (Australia)

Suddenly Australia is having the debate on energy and the curbing of greenhouse gas emissions that we should have been having years ago. But now we are actually talking – in the press, on radio, in boardrooms. And it’s not a faux debate, with nuclear power posing as a ‘green alternative’ – it’s a real debate over renewable sources, energy efficiency and how to effect a transition to a low-carbon economy.

With the debate about to move on to the specifics, the obvious place to start is with transport, because that’s where poor leadership in the past has saddled Australia with a 99.9 per cent dependence on oil.

Corporates in Australia are the prime users of the private transport system, and can take the initiative in weaning the country off its fossil fuel addiction. This is where good corporate citizenship can be tested.

To its great credit, the NRMA has taken up the challenge, and brought together a group of energy and transport experts known as the Jamison Group to draw up a roadmap to take Australia beyond oil dependence in transport. The group has now issued its first report and it deserves close scrutiny.

Today Australia consumes just over 38 billion litres of fuel annually for road and off-road vehicles – of which 19.3 billion litres comes from petrol, 2.3 billion litres from LPG (some of which comes from natural gas, and counts as an alternative), and 17 billion litres from diesel. A tiny amount – just 0.3 billion litres of E10 blend – can be counted as an alternative from biological sources. This, then, is less than 1 per cent of fuel sales (and with the ethanol itself accounting for only a tenth of this, or 0.1 per cent of total road transport fuel sales). This is the situation of total dependence on fossil fuels that successive governments have allowed to come to pass. The time for a fresh start has arrived – a start that is driven by three principal imperatives of economic security, energy security and environmental security.

Economic security means taking seriously the impending costs of remaining wedded to oil as our prime transport fuel at a time when imports of oil along with the price of oil relentlessly rising – a double whammy that makes the present cries of pain over fuel costs a mere whimper to what we can expect. So to enhance our economic security we must make a commitment to reducing our reliance on fossil fuels, and to rebuilding our industrial base, both to produce green and renewable energy and to use such energy sources preferentially – principally as a means of transport. Imported oil should carry a health warning: toxic to local economies!

Energy security means taking seriously the prospect of world oil supplies peaking (they may already be doing so) and thus highlighting the necessity of moving to an economy that is less and less dependent on oil as its driving force. Transport is in the front line here, because it starts with such near-total oil dependence. So moving away from oil dependence to relying increasingly on renewable and other low-carbon energy sources should be the guiding light in fashioning public policy. For transport options, that means supporting a new generation of electric-powered vehicles and new electric public transport systems for our cities, backed up with new industries for growing our own fuels (biomass, biooils, biogas, and first generation biofuels) and for making use of Australian-produced cleaner fuels such as natural gas.

Environmental security means taking the threats to our environment from the burning of fossil fuels seriously – from the planetary effects that are captured by the phrase ‘global warming’, to the local effects that are measured in terms of smog and air pollution in our cities, causing high levels of avoidable respiratory disease, cancer and other serious public health impacts. The immediate and short-term way to reduce such impacts is to insist that fuels sold in Australia meet the highest standards of fuel economy and health standards; while the longer term means of meeting the environmental threat involves again finding ways to rebuild our economy on a low-carbon footing. Geoscience Australia predicts that Australian production of crude oil plus condensate will hold at around 550,000 barrels per day until 2009 and then decline steadily, reaching a mid-range estimate of 224,000 barrels per day by 2025 (that is, a 50 per cent reduction) – as depicted in Figure 1. That means that oil production has already peaked in Australia.

As our domestic production peaks, so our imports of oil rise to keep up with relentlessly rising demand. The level of imports has risen by no less than 30 per cent in just four years – from 33.5 GL to 43.6 GL – a trend that commentators like Geosciences Australia see as continuing and getting worse.

Further, as the level of imports rises, so the balance of trade in petroleum products worsens. From a surplus in 2003 it has deteriorated rapidly, moving to a deficit in 2004 and reaching a huge deficit of nearly $10 billion in the current year.

So what is to be done?

First, we suggest the federal government announce a national goal of reducing oil dependence in Australia by 20 per cent by 2020; by 30 per cent by 2030; and by 50 per cent by 2050. A roadmap to reducing oil dependence should start with realistic goals that would seize public imagination in Australia and provide a benchmark against which all government policies could be measured. These goals would be subject to scrutiny by a panel of experts appointed by the government and required to report by 2009 on the feasibility of the goals and steps that could and should be taken to achieve them.

Secondly, promote and develop alternative fuels. The goal to reduce oil dependence should translate into a commitment to develop alternative fuels in Australia as well as to reduce consumption and improve energy efficiency generally. We need to encourage the development of three major alternatives to oil-based fossil fuels:

– Natural gas (CNG, LNG, LPG derived from natural gas);

– Biofuels (first generation ethanol and biodiesel; second generation lignocellulosic biofuels; bio-oils and biogas); and

– Electric vehicles (hybrids, plug-in hybrids and eventually all-electric vehicles).

These alternatives all provide opportunities to develop new industries in Australia, (subject to the most stringent environmental precautions, certification and development of national standards) that are on par with best international standards. There are vast opportunities for Australian businesses in such an approach.

Natural gas can be sourced from Australian reserves (some of which should be reserved for domestic use) and thus meet concerns over economic and energy security. Although natural gas burns more cleanly than petroleum, it is still a fossil fuel and contributes greenhouse gas emissions. As the national emissions trading scheme starts to bite, we see natural gas becoming the fuel of choice in power stations, thus competing as an end use with natural gas used in transport.

Biofuels are a natural candidate for expansion in Australia, but only in such a way that they are seen to be sustainable and deliver real greenhouse gas emissions improvements. This means expanding biofuels activities in such a way that they do not compete with food production and minimize fossil fuel inputs into the production process. Biofuels production should of course meet stringent environmental standards and be certified as such.

Electric vehicles are a promising automotive alternative, with zero tailpipe emissions, but they would not deliver real greenhouse gas gains at the moment because generation of electricity in Australia remains tied to the burning of coal. To the extent that power production responds to fresh policy initiatives (such as the national ETS) and renewable sources of electric power become available, so the electric car option will become more attractive.

Thirdly, we need compulsory fuel consumption standards. The best way to reduce oil dependence is to reduce the consumption of oil-based fuels in transport, through improvements in consumption standards and/or their equivalent in greenhouse gas emissions standards. This will be the single biggest saving on fuel costs that the government can offer to working families in Australia, no less than to the corporate sector.

Fourth, an alternative fuel market mandate. The best way to promote fuel alternatives is to set mandates for increasing market shares of alternatives. Alternative fuel industries will be built in Australia only to the extent that market mandates that break the grip of the petroleum industry on our fuels market are promulgated. Voluntary targets will not work, and urgent action is needed now to avoid the looming catastrophe of a balance of payments crisis caused by the costs of oil imports. We propose an alternative fuels mandate of 5 per cent by 2010, 10 per cent by 2015 and 20 per cent by 2020.

Such fuel market mandates can be found throughout the world where governments are serious about switching the fuel mix away from dependence on oil – in the EU, in the US, in Japan, and of course in Brazil where the feasibility of a non-oil transport fuel mix was first demonstrated. They should now be found in Australia as well. There are huge opportunities for Australian companies in such an approach.

Fifth, we need tax incentives to stimulate demand for vehicles running on alternative fuels or propulsion systems (for example EVs). The entire tax system, which is at present focused on raising revenue, should be refocused to accomplish a swing in the vehicle fleet towards flex-fuel vehicles running on both petroleum-based and alternative fuels; and towards vehicles that depart radically from oil dependence, particularly electric vehicles and hybrids. Vehicles and fuels that perform better would attract tax benefits, and vehicles that perform at current standards or worse would be penalized. In such an approach, corporates that modernise their vehicle fleets with fuel-efficient and low-emissions engines would attract tax incentives.

Six, we need tax incentives to grow new alternative fuels and to build the infrastructure needed. On the supply side, government can play a significant role in providing tax incentives to firms that are making investments in green energy. In transport terms this means offering incentives to automotive firms to shift to fuel efficient vehicles utilising new fuel efficient technologies (such as clean diesel); incentives to fuel distributors to offer a range of fuel dispensing systems including diesel, biofuels such as E10 and B5, and CNG; incentives to new biofuel producers building biorefineries to produce a range of first and second generation biogas, biooils and biofuels; and incentives to farmers to invest in new crops for producing energy without sacrificing our food production and export of food crops. The seventh suggestion is to identify the subsidies paid to reinforce current oil dependence and then wind them back. There exists a raft of explicit (as well as hidden) subsidies provided to fossil fuel industries in Australia, and one of the easiest ways for government to level the playing field is to dismantle these subsidies, explaining at the same time why it is doing so. The subsidies and incentives include tax benefits for cars provided by employers (but perversely excluding non-polluting forms of transport such as bicycles and public transport); import duty inequities for SUVs; non-recovery of public agency costs (such as the heavy industry support provided for the oil exploration industry); explicit fossil fuel tax concessions; fossil fuel energy R&D (such as massive expenditure in Australia on so-called ‘clean coal’ while winding back support for renewable energy R&D); the diesel fuel rebate scheme; and subsidies for road use and car parking.

Eight, we should use the proposed Emissions Trading System as a means of building alternative fuels industries. The proposed national emissions trading system is going to have to cover as many greenhouse gas emitting industries as possible if it is to function effectively. The fossil fuels industry, (with its mining and refining activities both intense emitters of greenhouse gases), cannot be allowed to be an exception. Already there is skirmishing underway, with claims that the transport sector should not be covered unless some other sector is also covered. These claims must not be allowed to progress. The counterpart to a compulsory emissions permit system is a system for allocating carbon credits to activities not covered by the ETS that reduce carbon emissions, or preferably sequester carbon already present in the atmosphere – as is done by carbon negative biofuels. As a complement to the proposed national ETS, the government could create a national mechanism for recognizing and certifying carbon credits (probably under the AGO) that would act in concert with, but across a broader range of activities, than the UN Clean Development Mechanism. Such certifiable credits could then be traded on carbon markets in Australia – giving a further financial incentive to farmers and producers of biofuels and other alternative fuels businesses (such as conversion kits suppliers) that could make a case to the AGO that they are creating carbon credits.

Finally, we need to drastically improve public transport, alternative modes of sustainable mobility and energy efficiency generally. The entire transport system in Australia has been weighted towards private mobility at the expense of public transport and sustainable mobility options such as cycling. A shift towards alternative fuels as a way of enhancing economic security, energy security and environmental security should be accompanied and complemented by a revitalization of public transport systems (inter-city rail; urban fast metros; light rail systems; mixed mode transport) and a new seriousness in promoting sustainable mobility alternatives such as cycling (cycle lanes and pathways; cycle rental and exchange depots).

(*) – The Jamison Group was established by the NRMA following the company’s Alternative Fuel Summit in 2006 and comprises four eminent scholars in the fields of energy and transport – David Lamb, Mark Diesendorf, John Mathews and Graeme Pearman

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Posted in AEOLIC, AGRICULTURE, AUSTRALIA, BANKING SYSTEMS, BIODIESEL, BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, ETHANOL, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FOREIGN POLICIES, HYDROGEN - FUEL CELLS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, MACROECONOMY, NATURAL GAS, RECESSION, SOLAR, SOLAR CELLS INDUSTRIES, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE WORK MARKET | Leave a Comment »

SUPER SUSTAINABILITY – CAN YOUR SUPER FUND SAVE THE WORLD?

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 5, 2008

Last Updated – December 04th 2008

by John Kavanagh

PUBLISHED BY ‘CORPORATE CITIZEN’ (Australia)

Blair Comley wants people in the investment community to change the way they think about the Australian Government’s climate change policy. With over $1 trillion sitting in Australian superannuation funds, the scope for changing the investment landscape is huge. Even a subtle shift in investment decisions by the managers of this capital could go a long way to unlocking some of this money and, in turn, help to achieve those policy goals.

BLAIR Comley, deputy secretary of the Department of Climate Change, believes companies and investors have become obsessed with the detail and have lost the big picture. They worry about how much a tonne of carbon emissions will cost in the new emissions trading scheme. They worry about how quickly the limits on carbon emissions will be adjusted. They worry about whether they will qualify for compensation and how much they will be entitled to receive. And investors in particular will worry about how many percentage points to knock off their earnings forecasts for polluters.

Comley finds this thinking understandable but narrow. After all, he says, achieving a low carbon economy is a major reform, a structural transformation of the economy. One estimate of the amount of investment required to build clean power generation facilities in Australia to meet the Government’s goals over the coming decade is upwards of $40 billion. The opportunities for investment in infrastructure are enormous.

The other thing that surprises Comley is how impatient business is over the issue, especially the investment community. Speaking at a climate change conference in Sydney in October, he reminded his audience of mostly financial services industry professionals that economic reform is usually a graduated process. Using the example of tariff reform, a major micro-economic policy launched by the Hawke Government in the 1980s, he said it was part of the socio-economic compact to spread the burden of reform by bringing in change over a number of years.

And it is not just a matter of spreading cost in an equitable way. The government knows it risks causing serious damage to the Australian economy if it gets things wrong. One risk factor is leakage – companies moving their polluting activities to economies where the rules are less stringent to avoid having a price and a cap put on their carbon emissions.

The issue of climate change has taken on a great deal of importance for investment managers following the release in July of the Government green paper on the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, and the Garnaut recommendations on emissions reductions. Both papers contain proposals that will have an impact on earnings, costs and investment programs for a wide range of Australian businesses over the coming decade, and both papers put forward a number of options.

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, also known as an emissions trading scheme, will set a price on a tonne of carbon emissions and determine which companies are included in the scheme and how they are to report their emissions. It will set up a compensation scheme and it will exempt certain industries (see breakout).

The Garnaut paper sets out the blueprint for emissions reduction and, in the process, points to the type of investment that will need to be made in renewable energy, transport, water systems and more.

The Government will publish a white paper in December and most analysts are waiting until then before they start drawing conclusions about how the investment markets will be affected by all of this.

Comley is right in thinking that the investment community is obsessed with detail and short-term issues. Respondents to a survey of fund managers conducted for Corporate Citizen by the Australian Centre for Corporate Social Responsibility (ACCSR) found that they were near-unanimous in saying they were not prepared to make investment decisions around climate change issues until they had a clear picture of the rules and the regulatory framework for the Government’s proposed carbon pollution reduction scheme.

It is those investment managers, analysts and asset consultants not ready to invest in climate change who are guiding the asset allocation decisions of the country’s biggest investors – the superannuation funds. Typical of the response is this comment from Elaine Prior, a senior analyst at Citi Investment Research: “Very clearly, we need a regulatory environment that allows change solutions to become economically viable. At the moment we have a lot of talk about climate change solutions and carbon emissions and so on but we don’t have a regulatory authority. And given that a lot of the things that will cut emissions will cost a lot of money, there needs to be that regulation to act as a catalyst for investment.”

Some specialist managers, however, report that they are finding investment opportunities. The managing director of Australian Ethical Investments, Anne O’Donnell, says an area where strong investor demand is emerging is for green commercial buildings. Community awareness of where energy savings can be made in buildings is relatively high and, as a result, tenants want to move into them and institutions want them in their portfolios.

Helga Birgden, head of responsible investment for the Asia Pacific at Mercer, says superannuation fund trustees with experience in investing in the agribusiness sector are starting to ask about how the issue of carbon sequestration fits into investment in the sector.

Managers in the small, specialist funds groups say the attention of large funds management groups has been caught by the imminent introduction of a system that will put a price on carbon emissions and have a direct impact on the earnings of many of the big companies in which they invest. But, like Comley, they see this as a very narrow focus. They need to look at renewables such as wind, which has demonstrated its viability already, consumer products that will assist households reduce their energy consumption, carbon capture technology, and suppliers to the public transport sector.

But the investment management industry is dominated by large financial institutions and they are fundamentally conservative organisations. Many of them have adopted standards such as UNPRI, the United Nations Principles for Responsible Investing, or ESG (environmental, social and governance) but they tend to use these metrics as overlays for making adjustments to their mainstream equity and fixed interest portfolios. In other words, they might reduce their portfolio weighting to steelmaker Bluescope if it shows up as a bigger polluter than OneSteel. What they are not doing is investing in clean energy start-ups or other businesses with a direct stake in climate change.

What many of the managers argue is that their mandate is to invest conservatively on behalf of people who are committing funds to their retirement savings. It is not their job to take risks on new ventures. And they also argue that the biggest impact of climate change policy will come from changes that big companies make to their business practices.

Survey respondent John Guadagnuolo, an investment manager at Portfolio Partners, says: “For instance, you might decide to invest in a company that participates in a process to capture carbon from coal-fired power stations. You are taking on significant risk because you are betting the carbon price will be high enough to pay off that investment. As a fund manager we might like low emissions or sustainability to be present in a company that we invest in but it’s not a deciding factor. If there’s too much risk it’s not something we can get into.”

Unspoken in all of this is the fear that investment managers have of being caught up in the next bubble, and the reputational damage that would follow. In 2000 the fund manager BT launched a fund called the BT TIME Fund. It was set up to invest in technology and new media and, coming on the crest of the dotcom wave, it was one of the most successful retail investment product launches ever. The wave crashed soon after and the BT fund has been a chronic underachiever ever since. It has reported an average annual loss of 14.5 per cent a year since its launch. No investment manager wants to be associated with such disasters and, in the case of clean technology, managers fear there are too many unknowns. Some investment managers say there has already been something of a bubble around biofuels and that the sector represents more hype than substance.

Some commentators argue that one reason there are too many unknowns is that the investment management industry has been slow to equip itself with the expertise that would allow it to make informed investment decisions in the sector. In October this year, the Financial Services Institute of Australia (Finsia) released the findings of a study it had undertaken with Griffith University Business School, looking into the preparedness of the financial services industry to respond to climate change and its capacity to do so. Like the ACCSR, it found that regulatory uncertainty was the biggest road block for investors, along with a perception that investment in emerging climate change technologies involved excessive risk and low returns.

But it also found that there was a lack of expertise, skills and knowledge about climate change throughout the industry. Finsia chief executive Martin Fahy says most investment managers were prepared to admit their engagement with the issue was inadequate and that there was a lack of leadership within their organisations pushing for change.

Some investment managers are prepared to concede this. Colonial First State head of sustainability and responsible investment, Amanda McClusky, says: “There’s a gap around education. The traditional training for an analyst is a finance degree and most of the education that analysts get does not include sustainability issues and, more broadly, social issues, reputation tracking, human capital and some corporate governance factors.”

The consensus among investment managers in the ACCSR survey was that in five or 10 years time climate change and sustainability will be mainstream investment issues. It took about 10 years for corporate governance to move from the fringe, where a handful of investment managers paid attention to issues of board independence, fair remuneration policies and transparency, to a situation today where investment managers are asked to justify why they don’t vote on director elections and remuneration proposals.

In the meantime, the field will have to be developed by a handful of specialists. One such specialist is Sean Wiles, an investment manager at CVC Sustainable Investments, a venture capital fund that aims to increase Australian private investment in renewable energy and enabling technologies through the provision of equity finance. (Funding is provided under the Australian Greenhouse Office’s Renewable Energy Equity Fund licence as well as from private sources.) Wiles reports that his fund has been investing in emerging Queensland gas producers such as Blue Energy. While gas is not exactly clean, it produces about 40 per cent of the carbon emissions of coal and receives favourable ESG scores from fund managers for that reason.

Wiles says he has trouble getting good research from brokers and investment bankers but has, nevertheless, been able to put together a portfolio of stocks in areas such as renewable energy, waste management and water. It all sounds great until you see the numbers: CVC has a mere $400 million invested across four funds.

In the end, it seems that a mix of strong, sound government policy as well as strong impetus from super clients is what is needed to shift money into climate-aware investment strategies. As Guadagnuolo says, “At the end of the day we’re a fund manager, not a venture capital firm. That makes a difference to how we see things. It’s not our job to develop new technologies, it’s our role to invest our clients’ money as we see prudent. As a venture capital firm you have much higher approval from your investors to take on risk.”

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Posted in AEOLIC, AGRICULTURE, AUSTRALIA, BANKING SYSTEMS, BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, HEALTH SAFETY, HYDROGEN - FUEL CELLS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, MACROECONOMY, NATURAL GAS, RECESSION, RECYCLING INDUSTRIES, REFINERIES - PETROL/BIOFUELS, REGULATIONS AND BUSINESS TRANSPARENCY, SOLAR, SOLAR CELLS INDUSTRIES, STOCK MARKETS, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE WORK MARKET, WATER | 1 Comment »

ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLANS SPRING UP AROUND WORLD

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 3, 2008

Published Tuesday, December 2, 2008

THE WASHINGTON POST

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE OMAHA WORLD-HERALD’ (USA)

WASHINGTON — In a bid to jump-start the beleaguered global economy, countries around the world are introducing massive public spending programs aimed at creating millions of jobs, boosting the use of green energy and modernizing infrastructure in a way that could transform urban and rural landscapes.

The viability of some of the plans remains unclear. But observers say the number of countries moving in tandem underscores the perceived severity of the coming global recession and the view that governments must at least temporarily pick up the slack as the hard-hit private sector sheds jobs and cuts spending.

It is time “to invest massively in infrastructure, in research, in innovation, in education, in training people, because it is now or never,” French President Nicolas Sarkozy said in a recent public address.

World leaders are pursuing various strategies to tame the economic crisis, including moves to unclog credit markets, strengthen financial institutions and ease monetary policy. But fiscal stimulus packages, in particular, have emerged as a favorite tool of policymakers.

Worldwide, economists say, the increase in public spending, if executed wisely, could add as much as 1 percent or 2 percent to global growth next year, perhaps easing recessions in the United States, Europe and Japan while cushioning the slowdown in the developing world, which until recently had seen red-hot growth.

Yet if the promise of combating a global recession with public funds is big, so too, experts say, is the danger that billions worth of taxpayers dollars could be spent in vain.

Analysts point out that the pitfalls of growth-by-spending were exposed by Japan, which launched a huge infrastructure program in the 1990s. To spur expansion after stock market and real estate crashes, the Tokyo government spent billions on new public works projects.

Those projects not only failed to prevent a decadelong economic slump but also produced a herd of white elephants that included new, but little-used, airports and ports, as well as a $250 million bridge to Kourijima Island. Population: 361.

“There is a huge danger of bridges to nowhere, and as Japan showed us, that is no way to get out of a recession,” said Grant Aldonas, a former high-level Bush administration trade official and a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

While China and Japan enjoy a surplus of reserves, spending increases will drive the United States, Britain and many other European countries deeper into debt. The cost of raising cash on world markets by some rich nations, such as Ireland, has surged as investors grow increasingly skeptical of their fiscal health, limiting their options to spend more now.

“In normal times, we would be telling countries, ‘Please reduce your debt,'” said Olivier Blanchard, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, which has taken the unusual step of calling on nations to raise public spending by 2 percent of gross domestic product to combat a global recession. “But these are not normal times.”

A snapshot of how governments plan to increase spending is emerging. Those plans include not only the building of more bridges and roads but also the introduction of measures to put more cash into the hands of strapped consumers.

In the United States, the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department have moved to boost consumer spending and lower home mortgage rates, committing as much as $800 billion to make it easier for Americans to borrow money for cars, tuition and homes.

The British said they would slash the national sales tax from to 15 percent from 17.5 percent. The Germans are set to offer temporary tax incentives to consumers buying cars or renovating homes. The Japanese are giving out cash rebates to taxpayers.

Some of the projects being proposed are pre-existing infrastructure plans that are being accelerated. Nicholas Lardy, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, estimates that only about half the “new projects” in Beijing’s $586 billion package amount to previously unplanned spending. “But that is still a great deal of money,” Lardy said.

A number of countries are gearing up for projects that offer long-term benefits, both economic and environmental.

In a move that may offer a guide to helping the ailing Big Three automakers in Detroit, the French are in the early stages of plans to assist their hard-hit auto industry by awarding government grants to boost research into hybrid and battery-power technology.

In comments last week, president-elect Barack Obama suggested that an expansion of wind and solar power generation would be part of his stimulus plans. Obama also cited a plan being circulated by environmental groups that would offer government loans to help schools update their heating and cooling systems, creating quick construction jobs and stimulating demand for building materials.

“I think the fervor in which (the Obama team) is seeking suggestions right now tells me that this kind of spending is something they are very serious about,” said Carl Pope, executive director the Sierra Club.

Some countries in Europe, such as Germany, appear more concerned about overspending. That is at odds with the leadership in France, where Sarkozy has seen the crisis as an opportunity to boost the role of government.

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Posted in BANKING SYSTEM - USA, BANKING SYSTEMS, BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA -(DEC. 2008/JAN. 2009), BIOFUELS, CENTRAL BANKS, CHINA, COMMERCE, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, EUROPE, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FINANCIAL CRISIS 2008/2009, FINANCIAL MARKETS, FRANCE, GERMANY, HOUSING CRISIS - USA, IMF, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION - USA, INDUSTRIES, INTERNATIONAL, JAPAN, MACROECONOMY, MARITIME, NATIONAL WORK FORCES, RAILWAY TRANSPORT, RECESSION, ROAD TRANSPORT, SOLAR, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, THE WORK MARKET, THE WORKERS, UNITED KINGDOM, USA | Leave a Comment »

USDA: MORE ACRES TO CORN IN 2009 (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 3, 2008

Published Wednesday – December 3, 2008

BLOOMBERG NEWS

PUBLISHED BY ‘THE OMAHA WORLD-HERALD’ (USA)

Farmers will increase corn planting by 4.8 percent to about 90 million acres next year as demand rises and lower costs make the grain more profitable, said Joe Glauber, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s top economist.

“We’re going to go into next year tighter than we did this year,” Glauber said Tuesday at an agricultural conference in Washington.

Inventories are expected to drop 31 percent to 1.124 billion bushels by Aug. 31 of next year, he said.

He did not offer 2009 planting forecasts for other crops.

Corn futures in Chicago have fallen 56 percent from a record earlier this year. Soybeans are down 48 percent and wheat 61 percent from all-time highs. Global recession and larger crops have fueled the drop, which will keep prices next year lower than this year, Glauber said.

Rabobank Group analyst Luke Chandler said he expects slumping grain prices to rebound next year because of smaller world crops and economic stability that will boost demand for food, animal feed and biofuels.

His outlook for grains:

– Corn may rise to average $4.50 a bushel in the fourth quarter of 2009, compared with $3.80 this quarter.

– Soybeans may gain 13 percent to an average $10.20 a bushel in the fourth quarter next year from $9 this quarter.

– Wheat prices may rise 9.1 percent to an average of $6 a bushel in Chicago in the fourth quarter next year, compared with $5.50 in the current quarter.

“South American production and exports also appear under pressure with a combination of seasonal and financial influences expected to lower production expectations in coming months,” Chandler said in a report to clients. “Short-term price direction over the next six to 12 months will remain heavily influenced by the broader financial, currency and energy market situation.”

Smaller crops in Australia and Argentina should lead to a cyclical low early in the first quarter of 2009, he said.

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Posted in AGRICULTURE, ANIMAL FOOD, BIOFUELS, COMMERCE, COMMODITIES MARKET, CORN, ECONOMIC CONJUNCTURE, ECONOMY, ECONOMY - USA, ENERGY, ETHANOL, FARMING SUBSIDIES, FINANCIAL CRISIS - USA - 2008/2009, FOOD INDUSTRIES, FOOD PRODUCTION (human), INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, RECESSION, THE LAST DAYS OF GEORGE WALKER BUSH - 2008/Jan. 2009, USA | Leave a Comment »

EKU TO EXPLORE MAKING FUEL FROM CELLULOSE (USA)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on December 3, 2008

Monday, December 1, 2008 – 3:45 PM EST

by Bradley S. Klapper – Associated Press

PUBLISHED BY ‘BUSINESS FIRST OF LOUISVILLE’ (USA)

Researchers at Eastern Kentucky University and San Diego, Calif.-based General Atomics Corp. announced Monday that they plan to look into making fuel from cellulose-based materials such as corn stover, forestry waste, switchgrass and sorghum at the new Eastern Kentucky University Center for Renewable and Alternative Fuel Technologies.

The center is being funded in part with $4 million in federal money.

The research it will undertake is vital to farmers who want a cash crop that can replace tobacco, as well as to lessening the state’s carbon footprint, EKU president Doug Whitlock said in a news release.

“This project is different in that it will be focused on production of biodiesel and ultimately jet fuel using non-food cellulosic materials in a process that will utilize algae to convert the biomass into bio-oils,” Whitlock said. “The research at EKU will determine both the optimal ‘recipe’ of cellulosic material and the economic feasibility of the project.”

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Posted in BIOFUELS, BIOMASS, ECONOMY, ENERGY INDUSTRIES, ENVIRONMENT, THE FLOW OF INVESTMENTS, USA | Leave a Comment »

UE DESCARTA REDUÇÃO DE INVESTIMENTOS EM BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS – Para o bloco, a meta de uso de um quinto de energia renovável até 2020 é essencial para a Europa

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 20, 2008

19 de Novembro de 2008

Eduardo Magossi/Agência Estado

O comissário da UE (União Européia) para Energia, Andris Piebalgs, disse nesta quarta-feira (19) em São Paulo que o bloco não deverá reduzir seus investimentos e suas metas de utilização de combustíveis renováveis em função da atual crise econômica. Segundo ele, a meta de uso de um quinto de energia renovável até 2020 é essencial para a Europa, não apenas política e economicamente, mas também como forma de garantir o suprimento energético necessário.

Piebalgs participou nesta quarta (19) de coletiva de imprensa na sede da Unica (União da Indústria da Cana-de-Açúcar) após reunir-se com representantes do setor sucroalcooleiro do Brasil. O comissário é responsável pela Diretiva Européia Sobre Fontes Renováveis de Energia, documento que reúne critérios que devem ser adotados para garantir a produção e suprimento de biocombustíveis na Europa. As metas da Diretiva se estendem até 2020.

O documento ainda será votado pelo Parlamento Europeu, o que deve acontecer em 8 de dezembro. Se aprovado, a principal meta é reduzir as emissões de gás carbônico em 20% até 2020. Nesta redução, 10% deverão vir do setor de transporte. Segundo o comissário, a maior parte da redução do setor de transporte deve acontecer pela utilização de biocombustíveis, embora não existam metas especificadas para etanol, biodiesel ou carros movidos a bioeletricidade. A segunda meta é de que 20% da energia utilizada pela Europa seja substituída por uma fonte renovável.

Piebalgs disse que os critérios adotados pela Diretiva não dão margem para questionamentos sobre barreiras não tarifárias. “Estive reunido com analistas brasileiros e nenhum deles levantou a possibilidade de que os critérios propostos pela UE possam gerar algum painel na Organização Mundial do Comércio”, disse. Ele também afirmou que a União Européia não terá condições de atender toda a demanda por biocombustível que será gerada com a aprovação da Diretiva. Ele acredita que 20% dessa demanda deverá ser importada e que o Brasil poderá ser uma fonte se atender a todos os critérios de sustentabilidade contidos na Diretiva. “O Brasil é um país responsável e sério e tem se mostrado capaz de garantir o desempenho sustentável do setor sucroalcooleiro.”

O comissário disse, contudo, que a Diretiva não tem nenhum poder sobre as tarifas existentes hoje sobre o biocombustível importado, mas essa discussão sobre tarifas pode ganhar maior relevância na rodada de Doha na OMC após a crise financeira mundial. Para ele, a energia renovável pode ser uma forma de alavancar a economia européia através de novos investimentos. Ele citou estudo recente da Organização Internacional de Energia que estima que o preço do barril do petróleo deverá ficar, em média, em US$ 100 no período de 2008 a 2015.

Unica

Antes da coletiva, o presidente da Unica, Marcos Jank, havia dito que a UE precisa definir com urgência uma política de matriz energética de longo prazo, englobando biocombustíveis, com a participação institucional do Brasil. Segundo ele, esta política deve ser baseada em critérios de sustentabilidade na produção e também no uso de biocombustíveis, que atendam às expectativas tanto dos produtores dos combustíveis alternativos como de exploradores de petróleo, refinadores e governos.

Jank afirmou que a visita do comissário é importante porque o parlamento europeu deve decidir até 8 de dezembro sobre a aprovação da Diretiva Européia sobre Fontes Renováveis de Energia, que propõe que os biocombustíveis utilizados na Europa emitam pelo menos um índice 35% inferior de gás causadores do efeito estufa em relação à gasolina e que sejam produzidos de forma sustentável.

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CREDIT CRUNCH SNARES CLEAN-TECH INVESTORS

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 12, 2008

Last updated November 11, 2008 5:21 p.m. PT

The Economist

Earlier this year, with the oil price at record heights, T. Boone Pickens, a celebrated Texas oilman, seemed to confirm the unstoppable growth of the clean-technology industry when he announced plans not only to build the world’s biggest wind farm, but also to spend $58 million of his personal fortune promoting the cause of wind power.

On Oct. 30, with oil prices having fallen by more than half, he told a television reporter that the boom he had foreseen in wind would be “put off,” due to the unexpected fall in the price of fossil fuels and the sudden difficulty of borrowing money.

Pickens is not the only clean-tech investor caught out by the credit crunch. New Energy Finance, a research firm, calculates that the amount of project finance devoted to clean-energy projects around the world fell by almost 25 percent in the third quarter, to $18 billion.

The firm expects it to fall further before the end of the year. It also expects firms to raise less money on stock markets, due to the financial turmoil. NEX, an index that tracks clean-tech stocks globally, has tumbled even faster than the market as a whole.

Big American utilities are slashing their investments in alternative energy. Florida Power & Light has cut its planned investment in wind power next year by 400 megawatts. Duke Energy of North Carolina has lopped $50 million off its budget for solar power.

And on Oct. 31 VeraSun Energy, one of America’s biggest ethanol producers, caught out by gyrations in the prices of corn and gasoline, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

In the European Union the price of carbon permits has fallen from a high of almost 30 euros in July to around 20 euros, making clean-tech investments less attractive.

But Michael Liebreich, the boss of New Energy Finance, expects total investments in clean energy to fall only slightly in 2008, thanks to a strong performance in the first part of the year.

Venture-capital and private-equity investments actually rose slightly in the third quarter. The price of oil aside, he says, the issues that stoked interest in clean tech, including global warming and energy security, are as prominent as ever.

A few customers for wind turbines, says Steve Bolze of GE Energy, are delaying their orders, but the firm has no doubts about the industry’s long-term prospects.

The world still needs energy, argues Steve Sawyer, the head of the Global Wind Energy Council, an industry group, and even if banks are slower to lend, utilities can often afford to pay for new generation out of their own revenues. Investing in dirtier sources of power carries risks of its own, he adds, as illustrated by the recent seesawing in the price of fossil fuels.

Moreover, a new rationale for promoting green investments is beginning to emerge. Many luminaries, from the head of the United Nations Environment Program to Barack Obama, America’s president-elect, tout the industry as a means both to address global warming and stimulate flagging Western economies.

Reports enumerating the economic benefits of state support for clean technology, in the form of industries fostered and jobs created, abound (although few of them examine the potential costs of such schemes, in the form of increased government debt and misallocated capital).

American lawmakers, at any rate, seem convinced: they slipped an extension of all-important subsidies for renewable energy into the recent bailout for financial services.

Clean-tech firms with strong business models can still raise money. EDF Energies Nouvelles, the renewable-energy firm controlled by Europe’s biggest utility, recently raised $734 million from a secondary share issue.

GridPoint, an American start-up that sells technology to improve the efficiency of electrical grids, raised $120 million in venture capital in September; Silver Spring Networks, another smart-grid firm, raised $75 million last month.

In general, firms selling technology that will earn a quick return, in fields such as energy efficiency, are proving most resilient. Capital-intensive businesses such as ethanol distilleries are struggling — especially Brazilian ones whose debts are in dollars while their revenues come in depreciating reais.

Makers of wind turbines and solar panels still have long waiting lists for their wares, so a slowdown is not as alarming as it sounds, Liebreich points out. Smaller manufacturers with weaker balance sheets will be snapped up by bigger, more efficient firms, he predicts, and shortages that have crimped the industry’s growth will ease.

The price of silicon, the chief component of photovoltaic cells, is already falling. Cheaper steel and copper should help reduce the cost of making wind turbines. A shortage of capital may become a new bottleneck, he says, but it will not kill off the industry any more than the previous ones did.

From The Economist magazine. Copyright 2008 Economist Newspaper Ltd.

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DEFINIDAS REGRAS DO ZONEAMENTO AGROECOLÓGICO DA CANA-DE-AÇÚCAR (Brasil)

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on November 4, 2008

Segunda-feira, Novembro 03, 2008

Canal Rural, em 03/11/2008

O ministro da Agricultura afirmou na sexta, dia 31, que não será permitido o plantio de cana-de-açúcar em novas áreas na Amazônia. O documento que determina as regras para o zoneamento agroecológico da cultura, deve ser lançado pelo presidente Lula no próximo dia 17, durante a abertura da Conferência Internacional de Biocombustíveis, em São Paulo. A proposta ainda está em análise na Casa Civil.

Os ministros do Meio Ambiente, do Desenvolvimento Agrário, da Agricultura e representantes do Ministério de Minas e Energia se reuniram nesta sexta no Palácio do Planalto, a portas fechadas, para analisar o documento que determina as regras para o aumento da produção de cana-de-açúcar no país. O que está em análise é um estudo que sugere restrições para garantir a segurança alimentar e a preservação do meio ambiente. De acordo com a proposta ficam proibidos o cultivo na Bacia do Alto Paraguai, a abertura de novas áreas para o plantio de cana na Amazônia e no Pantanal, a retirada de qualquer vegetação nativa para plantar cana e as freqüentes queimadas como forma de preparar a colheita nas áreas mecanizadas.

O ministro Reinhold Stephanes confirmou algumas medidas que estarão no texto final do zoneamento. As restrições ao plantio da cana devem ser limitadas à produção de açúcar e álcool. A expansão da área será permitida quando a produção for destinada a agroindústrias de ração animal, rapadura, açúcar mascavo e cachaça.

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SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUTER TRAINS SWITCH TO BIODIESEL

Posted by Gilmour Poincaree on October 30, 2008

October 29, 2008

South Florida’s inter-county Tri-Rail system is to start operating on bio-diesel, the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority has announced today.

Eight of 10 Tri-Rail locomotives, which run between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach, will use a 99% blend of either palm or soy oil, official say. The other two locomotives will continue to use regular diesel.

Because of Miami’s warm climate, the Tri-Rail is one of the few commuter rail systems in the country that can tolerate such a high blend of bio-fuel (biodiesel will congeal at cold temperatures).

While the Tri-Rail locomotives use 7 percent more fuel when operating on biodiesel, the fuel costs approximately 30 cents per gallon less than diesel, according to the South Florida RTA.

– David Adams, Times Staff Writer

Posted by Times Editor at 12:57:42 PM on October 29, 2008

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